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Two-Phase Thermal Technology Development at JPL
Presenter Takuro Daimaru
Published May 2024
Recorded May 2024
Duration 00:00
Tags None
Instructions:<br>- Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur.<br>- Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder.<br>- Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible.<br>- Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end.<br>- Enjoy!<br><br>Abstract:<br>This presentation gives an overview of two-phase thermal technology development for future JPL missions. Primary technologies include Oscillating Heat Pipe, Loop Heat Pipe, and Two-Phase Pump Fluid Loop. <br><br>About the Presenter:<br>Taku Daimaru is a thermal engineer and director of Two-Phase Thermal Technology Lab at JPL. His research focuses are on the development of advanced thermal control technologies for space applications, with a particular emphasis on Oscillating Heat Pipes (OHPs) and Two-Phase Thermal Technologies. His current goal is to infuse advanced Two-Phase Thermal Technologies into JPL's future planetary exploration missions to enable missions in more challenging thermal environments and enable higher-capability spacecraft for higher-quality science returns.
NASA in the Quantum Age: Quantum Sensors for Space Science
Presenter Dr. Peter Brereton
Published May 2024
Recorded May 2024
Duration 00:00
Tags None
Instructions:<br>- Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder.<br>- Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible.<br>- Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end.<br>- Enjoy!<br><br>Abstract:<br>In support of the National Quantum Initiative and advancing exploration, science, and technology in aeronautics and space, NASA has made increasing investments in quantum sensors over the past 20 years. As an illustration, three use cases for quantum sensors to get at “NASA-scale” measurement problems will be presented: Cold atom gravity gradiometry for Earth Science: the interference of laser cooled atoms can be harnessed to achieve order of magnitude improvements over classical gravity recovery measurements. Space optical atomic clocks: The frequency stability and time hold over achievable in optical atomic clocks can enable precision navigation and timing networks on the moon, enable autonomous precision landing on planetary bodies, and deep space navigation. Quantum magnetometers: Detection of magnetic fields by atoms or atom-like systems in the solid state can potentially enable a host of science and technology goals across NASA mission areas.
Single Event Environment (SEE) Effects on Spacecraft Avionics Systems
Presenter Dr. Steven Koontz
Published April 2024
Recorded May 2024
Duration 01:29:58
Tags None
The space-flight ionizing radiation environment is dominated by very high-kinetic energy-charged particles with relatively smaller contributions from neutrons, X-rays, and gamma rays. Strikes by individual high-energy charged particles and neutrons can cause data corruption, lock-ups, or even hard failures of mission-critical spacecraft electronics. Dr. Steven Koontz’s lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics underlying safety, reliability and missions’ success risks posed by the SEE environment in low-Earth orbit, Earth’s magnetosphere, and cis-lunar space.
Enabling a Safe and Sustainable Commercial Space Economy
Presenter Dr. Piyush Mehta
Published April 2024
Recorded April 2024
Duration 01:02:42
Tags None
About the Speaker: <br>Dr. Mehta is an Assistant Professor of Space Systems in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at West Virginia University with research interests in orbital/satellite drag in space situational awareness and atmospheric reentry. Space debris remains a persistent threat to assets and humans in space. The proliferation of low Earth orbit (LEO) with replenishable small satellite megaconstellations driven by commercial interests has further stressed Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and put focus on space traffic management (STM). While the trackable debris catalog has grown significantly over the last decade, lethal non-trackable (LNT) debris smaller than the order of centimeters in size remains a challenge as they fall below the detection and tracking capability of most ground-based sensors. In addition to catalog maintenance under SSA, STM has put focus on enhanced and concerted space operations that includes conjunction assessment and collision avoidance. The US Space Policy Directive-3, National STM Policy has emphasized the necessity “to make significant contributions to establish a quality threshold for actionable collision avoidance warning to minimize false alarms”. Accurate calculation of Probability of Collision (PoC) for confident decision-making require realistic covariance information since maneuvers are expensive (personnel cost, science data or commercial service outage, fuel costs). The continued LEO proliferation will overwhelm the operators who are likely to receive multiple collision warning messages a day. West Virginia University is leading two high-profile projects supported by Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and Office of Space Commerce (OSC) targeted at addressing the challenge of LNT debris and enhancing LEO operations, respectively, critical for a safe and sustainable space economy and environment. The talk will provide an overview of the projects and a summary of the technical advances.
Dynamics: Introduction to Kane's Method
Presenter Carlos Roithmayr
Published March 2024
Recorded March 2024
Duration 56:03
Tags #Advanced, #State of the Art, ~Equation of Motion, .Analysis / Modeling and Simulation, .Design, ~Flight Mechanics, ~Analysis, ~Kane's Method, ~Multibody Dynamics, ~Rigid Body, ~Particle, ~Nonholonomic System, ~Flight Dynamics, ~Simulation
Discipline: Flight Mechanics<br><br>Kane's method of formulating dynamical equations of motion has proved especially useful for dealing with the complex multibody mechanical systems that in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have challenged engineers in industry, government, and universities: the Galileo spacecraft sent to Jupiter, the International Space Station, and the robotic manipulator arms aiding astronauts on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station are but a few examples. The method is systematic and easily taught. The basic apparatus of Kane's method is presented, and then applied in examples involving a single particle, a single rigid body, two connected rigid bodies, and a nonholonomic system. Brief comparisons between Kane's method and other classical methods are made throughout.<br><br>About the Speaker:<br>Carlos M. Roithmayr is a senior aerospace engineer in the Systems Analysis and Concepts Directorate at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. He earned a Bachelor of Aerospace Engineering degree at the Georgia Institute of Technology, both an M.S. and a Degree of Engineer in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He began his career with NASA at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. His research interests include dynamics of multibody mechanical systems, spacecraft attitude dynamics and control, and orbital mechanics, and he has contributed to a wide variety of Agency projects and missions. He is author or coauthor of numerous refereed journal papers.
How Type-II Superlattice (T2SL) Focal Planes Changed the Infrared Landscape
Presenter Sarath D Gunapala
Published February 2024
Recorded February 2024
Duration 53:43
Tags None
Abstract:<br>In this presentation, Sarath Gunapala will discuss his experience as a technologist (developing novel infrared detectors/ focal plane arrays for various remote sensing applications) and how T2SL focal plane array technology has changed the Infrared Landscape.<br><br>About the Speaker: <br>Sarath D. Gunapala received a First Class Honors BSc in physics from the University of Colombo, Sri Lanka in 1980, and an MS and PhD in Physics from the University of Pittsburgh in 1986. In his early years of research, Sarath worked on opto-electronic devices at Bell Communication Research and AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey. Later he joined NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California where he is a Fellow, Senior Research Scientist and a Principal Member of the Engineering Staff. Sarath has authored over 350 journal publications, 14 book chapters, and holds 27 U.S. patents. He has received numerous awards including the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, NASA Exceptional Engineering Achievement Medal, Career Achievement Award from U.S. Army/RDECOM/CERDEC, IEEE Aron Kressel Award, Military Sensing Symposia (MSS) Herschel Award, MSS Levinstein Award, SPIE George Goddard Award, and was inducted to United States Space Technology Hall of Fame 2001. He is also a fellow member of IEEE, SPIE, and Optica.
Common Applications for Acoustic Emission Testing (AET)
Presenter Steven Garcia
Published January 2024
Recorded January 2024
Duration 39:55
Tags #Intermediate, .Testing
Abstract:<br>Acoustic Emission Testing (AET) is a powerful non-destructive evaluation technique used across various industries to assess the structural integrity of materials and components under stress. This method involves detecting and analyzing transient stress-induced waves or signals emitted by materials when subjected to external forces. AET serves as a valuable tool for monitoring the behavior of materials, detecting defects, and predicting potential failures in diverse structures ranging from pipelines and bridges to aerospace components<br><br>About the Speaker:<br>Mr. Garcia has done extensive work in the area of Fitness for Service using Acoustic Emission testing, including mechanical integrity assessments of ASME pressure vessels, pre-service proof testing, requalification testing, in-service monitoring, leak detection and location for LNG service facilities, above ground storage tank inspections and general fitness-for-service applications of reactors, pressure vessels, piping and other components related to refineries and chemical plants in several countries around the world. Mr. Garcia has done extensive acoustic emission testing and laser scanning of refinery coke drums for the past several years. Work experience also includes composite pressure vessel (COPV) testing for major aerospace companies. Mr. Garcia has provided project support to senior engineering staff for field engineering/testing using high-speed data acquisition systems in remote locations. Mr. Garcia also has experience in vibration monitoring and field metallography related to refinery/chemical plant services.<br>
The Visual Experience at the Lunar South Pole
Presenter Charles Dischinger
Published December 2023
Recorded December 2023
Duration 01:10:35
Tags #Fundamental, .Analysis / Modeling and Simulation, .Design, .Operations, .Lessons Learned, .Environments, .Systems / Subsystems, ~Lunar South Pole, ~Visual Experience, ~Human Vision, ~Lighting, ~Natural Environments, ~Spacesuit Design
NASA’s Artemis Campaign intends to return humans to the moon in the coming years, with the intent to explore and establish permanent human presence there. The targeted landing and habitation sites are at the Lunar South Pole (LSP). These sites experience very different lighting conditions from those in the Lunar middle latitudes, where the Apollo landings occurred, which typically are in full sun for half the lunar day (approximately twenty-nine earth days). At the poles, the sun is never high in the sky. It never gets above seven degrees in elevation, at the sites being considered, and it is more often only one or two degrees above the horizon. As a result, the visual experience for the astronauts who explore and live there will be very different from that which the Apollo astronauts encountered. Those earlier missions were planned such that the sun was far above the astronauts, for most or all of their time on the surface. In contrast, at the LSP, the sun will often be in their field of view, and the shadows will be extremely long, when they face away from the sun. Their visual systems will be stressed by high intensity and glare and then often need to adjust to extreme darkness. Since the human eye does not make such shifts rapidly, highly capable lighting systems must be carefully designed. The NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) is studying the problem, to characterize the extremes that astronauts will encounter and help programs characterize the lighting systems and glare protection that will be needed for safe surface operations. This presentation will describe the natural environments and the attempts to simulate the visual experience. It will also explain the risks derived from the lighting environment, for the mission goals currently planned and the kinds of new capabilities in simulation and surface equipment that will support those mission goals.<br><br>Speaker Biographies:<br><br>Charles Dischinger - Charlie joined the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in 1994, as his third career. He was fortunate enough to be married to someone NASA needed. He has worked on human factors design for the International Space Station, for EVA and IVA systems. He was a systems engineer for Gravity Probe B. He worked on requirements development for the Constellation Program and at Headquarters, in the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance. On his return to MSFC, he became the team lead for the Human Engineering Assessment Team, and then the deputy to the Technical Fellow for Human Factors. Throughout his NASA tenure, he has worked on some of the most interesting efforts imaginable, in which he has been propped up and made to look presentable by many of the smartest people in the world; don’t think he doesn’t know it and appreciate it.<br><br>Mary K. Kaiser - After 30 years as a research psychologist in the Human Systems Integration Division at NASA Ames Research Center, Mary K. Kaiser now serves as a consultant to the Human Factors Technical Discipline Team of the NASA Engineering & Safety Center. Mary received her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Virginia, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan in applied experimental psychology before joining Ames in 1985. The author of over sixty articles and chapters on perceptual psychology and human factors and a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, Mary also served as an associate editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance (1998 – 2009) and as Project Scientist for NASA’s Space Human Factors Engineering Project (2009 – 2013). She holds two patents for innovative display technologies. Mary lives with her husband, Franz, near Portland, Oregon. Their two sons had the audacity to grow up and move out of the house. <br><br>
Overview of Spacecraft Thermal Control, Part 3: Thermal Control Hardware
Presenter David Gilmore
Published December 2023
Recorded November 2023
Duration 51:18
Tags #Fundamental, .Hardware
About the speaker:<br>David G. Gilmore is a Senior Engineering Specialist in the Spacecraft Thermal Department at The Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, California. Mr. Gilmore has acquired over 40 years of experience in the design, analysis, test, and flight operations of spacecraft thermal control systems. He has provided support to a wide range of scientific, commercial, and military spacecraft programs. In addition to his activities at The Aerospace Corporation, he is also the editor and a contributing author of the Spacecraft Thermal Control Handbook.
Overview of Spacecraft Thermal Control, Part 2: Subsystem Design
Presenter David Gilmore
Published December 2023
Recorded November 2023
Duration 01:13:22
Tags #Fundamental, .Systems / Subsystems
About the speaker:<br>David G. Gilmore is a Senior Engineering Specialist in the Spacecraft Thermal Department at The Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, California. Mr. Gilmore has acquired over 40 years of experience in the design, analysis, test, and flight operations of spacecraft thermal control systems. He has provided support to a wide range of scientific, commercial, and military spacecraft programs. In addition to his activities at The Aerospace Corporation, he is also the editor and a contributing author of the Spacecraft Thermal Control Handbook.
Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
Presenter Scott B. Tashakkor
Published December 2023
Recorded September 2023
Duration 57:41
Tags #Fundamental, .Analysis / Modeling and Simulation, ~Machine Learning, ~Software Design, ~Software Assurance, ~Artificial Intelligence, ~NASA Policy
About the Speaker:<br>Mr. Tashakkor is currently serving as a Deputy to the NESC Software Technical Fellow. He joined NASA in 2008 after working on his first masters degree on higher order computational fluid dynamics for acoustics, which was funded through a NASA SBIR and being used at Marshall Space Flight Center. In his career he has focused on flight and ground software development, security, verification, and validation. He started out working computational models for launch vehicles and the associated system components. From there he moved into writing the embedded flight software for Space Launch System (SLS) and other systems. He became the lead of Guidance, Navigation, and Control software for SLS. After winning several awards for this work (including a NASA Early Career achievement award), he switched to working ground system software and operations for several years. He then rejoined flight software and expanded working more with the NESC. Mr. Tashakkor has an undergraduate degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and has two master’s degrees, Aerospace and Computer Engineering. He was born in Decatur, Illinois and resides in Huntsville, Alabama.
Combustion of Metal Powders for Power and Heat Generation in Space Missions
Presenter Dr. Evgeny Shafirovich
Published November 2023
Recorded November 2023
Duration 55:47
Tags #State of the Art, .Design, .Testing, ~Combustion of Metals, ~Oxidation of Metals, ~Space Power Systems, ~Lunar Night Survival
Abstract:<br>Power systems based on combustion reactions between solid or liquid reactants could provide heat and electric power in space missions where the use of sunlight and nuclear energy is impossible or impractical. Some combustible mixtures have very high energy densities compared to the best batteries. Recently, combustion of lithium with sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and carbon dioxide has been studied for this application, but there are some problems with using these systems in space. Our approach is based on the use of lithium and magnesium powders as the fuel and chemically generated oxygen as the oxidizer. In situ CO2 could also be used as the oxidizer in missions to Mars and Venus. In this talk, we will present (1) a conceptual design of a power system for lunar night survival that uses Li or Mg powders and commercially available chemical oxygen generators, (2) kinetic studies on the oxidation of Li and Mg powders in O2 and CO2, and (3) experiments on the combustion of these powders with infiltrating O2 and CO2. This work was supported by an Early-Stage Innovations Grant from NASA’s Space Technology Research Grants Program (Grant No. 80NSSC20K0293) with Steven L. Rickman serving as a NASA Collaborator.<br><br>About the Speaker:<br>Dr. Evgeny Shafirovich is a Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP). He received his PhD from the Russian Academy of Sciences in 1988. Prior to joining UTEP in 2008, he conducted research at the Russian Academy of Sciences, the French National Center for Scientific Research, the University of Notre Dame, and Purdue University. His research interests include combustion of metals, propellants, and gas-generating materials as well as combustion synthesis of advanced materials for clean energy and aerospace applications.
Launch Vehicle Design and Requirements Verification Using Statistical Methods
Presenter John Hanson
Published November 2023
Recorded November 2023
Duration 01:12:59
Tags #Intermediate, #State of the Art, ~Induced Environments, .Analysis / Modeling and Simulation, .Design, ~Performance, ~Monte Carlo, ~Order Statistics, ~Meeting Requirements, ~Design Analysis
Abstract:<br>This presentation will include a description of statistical methods to derive models of launch vehicles that can be used during design phases in order to demonstrate that performance requirements will be met, and in order to derive driving design parameters that can be used to define what environments and other parameters the vehicle must endure. The approaches developed in this paper can be applied to other complex design efforts as well. This paper also explains a method (order statistics) for determining whether certain probabilistic requirements are met and enables the user to determine how many Monte Carlo samples are required. These methods also apply to determining the design values of parameters of interest in driving the design.<br><br>About the Speaker:<br>John Hanson has been with NASA since 1990 after previously working at the ANSER Corporation on Air Force space projects. At NASA he spent over 20 years in the Flight Mechanics/GN&C discipline in areas of increasing responsibility. He was a team lead, Branch Chief, and Technical Assistant for the Division. He led Flight Mechanics/GN&C work on the X-33 and Ares projects. He led the Advanced Guidance and Control Project that led to the adaptive flight control being used for SLS, and developed the process being used for verifying probabilistic SLS requirements. He was the Alternate Lead Systems Engineer for SLS from 2011-2016, followed by detail assignments as SLS Deputy Chief Engineer, Vehicle Management Discipline Lead Engineer, Technical Assistant for the Structures and Environments Division, and Technical Assistant to the SLS Chief Engineer. <br><br>He was detailed to the NASA Office of Chief Engineer as the Deputy HEOMD Chief Engineer for Exploration Systems Development. Later he was Lead Systems Engineer for the Exploration Upper Stage, and is currently Deputy Chief Engineer for Systems Engineering and Integration in the Moon to Mars Program. He is an AIAA Associate Fellow and has received the AIAA De Florez Award for Flight Simulation, the Silver Snoopy Award, the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and other awards from NASA. He holds a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Michigan.
What is cFS?
Presenter Lorraine Prokop
Published October 2023
Recorded October 2023
Duration 18:25
Tags #Fundamental, #State of the Art, .Design, .Testing, .Operations, ~Software Design, ~Flight Software, ~Framework, ~Reuse, ,Systems/Subsystems, ,Environments, ~CFS
Modular Damage Detection For Expandable Structures
Presenter Mark L Lewis
Published October 2023
Recorded October 2023
Duration 54:37
Tags #Advanced, .Systems / Subsystems, ~Damage Detection, ~Health Management, ~Expandable Structures, ~Meteoroid Sensing, ~Health Monitoring, ~Composite Materials
Abstract:<br>The 2020 CIF funded Modular Composite Damage Detection System (MCDDS) aims to advance the technology of damage detection in composites in the areas of thin, flexible damage detection panel construction, encapsulation techniques in composite matrixes, innovative integration and interfacing techniques with flexible embedded sensory panels, repair methods of composite materials, and improved packaging of the MCDDS. <br><br>Bio's:<br>Mark Lewis received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Cleveland State University. Mr. Lewis has over 30 years of experience at NASA and currently serves as the Technical Integration Manager for Moon to Mars activities in Exploration Research & Technology Programs at KSC. Mr. Lewis began his career at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) as an electrical engineer providing avionics, electronics, instrumentation, and software design support for many spaceflight payload experiments. Later, Mr. Lewis transferred to KSC and served as a Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Project Engineer for the Space Shuttle Program. He has extensive systems engineering and integration expertise and research experience developing damage detection, health management, and robotic systems at KSC. He has flight hardware development experience including satellite servicing and microgravity physical science experiments. Mr. Lewis is listed as an inventor on seven patents.<br><br>Tracy L. Gibson received the B.S. in chemistry from the University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, Indiana in 1992 and the Ph.D. in chemistry from Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida in 1999. <br>Since 2003 he was worked as a contractor at Kennedy Space Center and is currently a Subject Matter Expert 2 for the Laboratory Support Services and Operations II Contract. He has supported numerous research projects, including projects related to materials development and in-situ resource utilization and has research experience in developing methods for the capture and processing of the Martian atmosphere and converting waste products into fuels. He also has research experience in the development of self-healing materials for aerospace applications, novel magnetic materials, damage detection systems, as well as development of systems for intelligent thermal management. He has extensive experience in sensor development and testing. He holds multiple U.S. Patents and is also listed as an innovator on more than 90 NASA New Technology Reports.<br><br>Dr. Gibson has received numerous awards while at Kennedy Space Center, including the NASA STS-115 Space Flight Awareness Launch Honoree Award in 2006, NASA KSC Engineer/Scientist of the Year Award, Contractor Category in 2009, the NASA Exception Public Service Medal in 2010, the NASA Silver Achievement Medal in 2014, and the 2020 Outstanding Chemical Professional, Orlando Section of the American Chemical Society.<br> <br><br><br><br>
Leakage Correlation from Helium to Working Fluid
Presenter Eugene Ungar
Published September 2023
Recorded December 2021
Duration 01:03:08
Tags None
The allowable leakage rate for space hardware is typically specified as standard cubic centimeters/second (scc/sec) of helium. It is important to be able to use the measured helium leakage rate to calculate the expected leakage rate of the working fluid. In this seminar, Dr. Eugene Ungar explored the physical configuration of typical leak paths, discussed the physics of molecular, transition, and continuum flow, and presented the accepted method of conservatively calculating the expected leakage rate of the working fluid.
SHARE Heat Pipe Experiment Part II
Presenter Eugene Ungar
Published September 2023
Recorded December 2021
Duration 25:52
Tags None
Identify lessons learned related to the SHARE Heat Pipe Experiment. Analyze the testing issues and actions taken. Identify development, testing and analysis actions which could have resolved the issues more effectively.
SHARE Heat Pipe Experiment Part I
Presenter Eugene Ungar
Published September 2023
Recorded December 2021
Duration 53:48
Tags None
Identify lessons learned related to the SHARE Heat Pipe Experiment. Analyze the testing issues and actions taken. Identify development, testing and analysis actions which could have resolved the issues more effectively.
What is NPR 7150.2?
Presenter Lorraine Prokop
Published September 2023
Recorded August 2023
Duration 23:27
Tags #Fundamental, .Design, .Testing, .Systems / Subsystems, ~Software Design, ~Procedure Integration, ~Testing, ~Software Engineering, ~Software Process, ~Assurance, ~Software Quality
Introduction to Heat Pipes
Presenter Eugene Ungar
Published September 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 01:22:39
Tags None
Heat pipes provide capillary driven heat transport. Simple constant conductance heat pipes are totally passive. More complex heat pipes, such as variable capacitance heat pipes and loop heat pipes, use heaters to maintain a constant heat acquisition temperature. Dr. Eugene Ungar presented the theory of operation for the different types of heat pipes and explored their design parameters and operational limits.
The Path to Detecting Extraterrestrial Life With Astrophotonics
Presenter Nemanja Jovanovic
Published September 2023
Recorded September 2023
Duration 01:01:24
Tags None
Abstract:<br>Astrophysical research into exoplanets has delivered thousands of confirmed planets orbiting distant stars. These planets span a wide range of size and composition, with diversity also being the hallmark of system configurations, the great majority of which do not resemble our own solar system. Unfortunately, only a handful of the known planets have been characterized spectroscopically thus far, leaving a gaping void in our understanding of planetary formation processes and planetary types. To make progress, astronomers studying exoplanets will need new and innovative technical solutions. Astrophotonics -- an emerging field focused on the application of photonic technologies to observational astronomy -- provides one promising avenue forward. In this paper we discuss various astrophotonic technologies that could aid in the detection and subsequent characterization of planets and in particular themes leading towards the detection of extraterrestrial life.<br><br>About the Speaker:<br> Nemanja Jovanovic received his Ph.D. in laser physics from Macquarie University in 2010. He worked as a postdoc. on astrophotonics at the Australian Astronomical Observatory until 2012. He moved to Subaru Telescope where he was part of the SCExAO high contrast exoplanet imaging instrument team until 2017. Currently, Nemanja is the Optics and Systems Group Lead at Caltech developing advanced exoplanet instruments for the largest ground based telescopes while leading several technical developments in astrophotonics.
Implications of Operational Pressure
Presenter Ryan Lee
Published September 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 01:18:39
Tags None
Aerotherm Chemical Equilibrium (Ace) and Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation Programs (Cma) Tutorial
Presenter Michael O'Malley
Published September 2023
Recorded September 2023
Duration 43:47
Tags #Advanced, .Analysis / Modeling and Simulation, ~Ablation, ~Erosion, ~Char, ~Nozzle, ~SRM, ~Carbon Phenolic
Discipline: Thermal Control & Protection<br><br>Abstract:<br>The main thermal design considerations in a solid rocket motor (SRM) nozzle are erosion and char of the insulation liner and the bondline temperature between the liner and overwrap. The bondline between the liner and overwrap usually has a temperature limit it must not exceed by end of burn (EOB). The ACE/CMA code calculates the thermal erosion and char of the carbon phenolic in the nozzle exit cone at each station and the heat conduction into the aft exit cone which provides bondline temperatures used for requirement validation. The ACE/CMA model results can be validated by data obtained from a static motor test. With the validated model, bondline temperature predictions can be made using 3σ erosion and char. <br><br>This presentation will illustrate the various steps involved in creating this analysis. Included will be a description of the various codes, inputs required and how the various outputs from codes are used as inputs for other codes to arrive at a solution. The process used to match data and validate the model will be discussed. The results will demonstrate what looked like an issue, the bondline exceeding the required temperature, is not because the predicted bondline temperature transient shows the exceedance occurs significantly after EOB.<br><br>About the Presenter:<br>Mr. O’Malley received his B.S. in Chemical engineering from Arizona State University in 1979 and his M.S. in Mechanical engineering from University of Iowa in 1985. He was employed by Thiokol Corporation at Promontory, Utah for 13 years in the thermal group specializing in SRM motor joint flow/thermal analysis and nozzle ablation analysis. Significant experience was gained while involved in the redesigned solid rocket motor effort after the Challenger accident. Presently employed by NASA, supporting the LSP program for the last 20 years. LSP specializes in integration of spacecraft to launch vehicles, qualification of spacecraft components and entire launch vehicles, thermal analysis, anomaly resolution and launch console support. Supported from its inception, the qualification effort for the GEM63 and GEM63XL SRM program for the Atlas V and Vulcan programs.
Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) ISS Distributed Impact Detection System (DIDS)
Presenter Nathan Wells
Published August 2023
Recorded July 2023
Duration 01:02:36
Tags None
Abstract:<br>Expandable modules for use in space and on the Moon or Mars offer a great opportunity for volume and mass savings in future space exploration missions. This type of module can be compressed into a relatively small shape on the ground, allowing them to fit into space vehicles with a smaller cargo/fairing size than a traditional solid, metallic structure-based module would allow. In April 2016, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) was berthed to the International Space Station (ISS). BEAM is the first human-rated expandable habitat/module to be deployed and crewed in space. BEAM was developed as a NASA managed ISS payload project in partnership with Bigelow Aerospace. BEAM has been installed on ISS for a total of 8 years although initially was intended to only stay attached to ISS for an operational period of 2 years to help advance the technology readiness for future expandable modules. BEAM has been instrumented with a suite of space flight certified sensors systems which will help characterize the module’s performance for thermal, radiation shielding and impact monitoring against potential Micro Meteoroid/Orbital Debris (MM/OD) providing fundamental information on the BEAM environment for potential health monitoring requirements and capabilities. <br><br>This presentation will focus on the Distributed Impact Detection System (DIDS) which is actively being utilized 24/7 for MM/OD impact detection. This will provide an overview of how the sensors/instrumentation systems were developed, tested, installed and an overview of the current sensor system operations and how its data is being reviewed on the ground by the ISS loads and dynamics team.<br><br>Presenter Bio:<br>Nathan Wells currently serves as the Instrumentation Technical Discipline Lead for the Avionic Systems Division at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas where he supports the International Space Station (ISS) Program for various Structural Health Monitoring systems as well supporting the Gateway Program as a Project Manager for development/testing work of a Time Triggered Ethernet Network for Northrop Grumman in their Habitation and Logistics Outpost (HALO) module design. In his capacity he also serves as a JSC representative for the NESC Sensor and Instruments Technical Discipline Team and is deputy lead for the NESC In-Situ and Proximity Community of Practice. Nathan earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) and completed studies for a Master of Science degree in Technical Management in a Technical Position. His past work involved working on various International Space Station (ISS) countermeasures/exercise device projects serving as a project engineer and project manager as well as serving as the Project Manager for a Shuttle Program Return to Flight project called the “Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System” (WLEIDS) between 2007-2011 and working as the lead Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) engineer for the Morpheus project between 2010 and 2013. Nathan has received numerous awards and honors including the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal in 2016 and Silver Snoopy Award in 2021.<br><br>Aaron Trott is a Program Director who has been employed with Invocon, Inc. for over twenty-seven years. His present roles include product manager for launch vehicle control systems and project manager for aerospace data acquisition systems. Other activities include business development, research & development, and systems engineering. Specific focus areas are instrumentation system developments for applications in the aerospace industry. Aaron earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in Electrical Engineering from Mississippi State University, during which time he participated in the cooperative education program at NASA Langley Research Center. During his graduate studies, he also worked at the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Computational Field Simulation.
Human/Machine Teaming: Dancing with the Bear
Presenter Paul Schutte
Published August 2023
Recorded August 2023
Duration 01:00:36
Tags None
Discipline: Human Factors<br><br>Abstract:<br>With the advent of Foundation Models (e.g., large language models like ChatGPT) and stunning successes such as AlphaGo’s creation of a new and surprising winning strategy, dire predictions of human obsolescence have reemerged. However, current developments are in line with past AI trends which suggest that AI will be amazing but with regard to real-world operations (i.e., not games), there will still be a non-negligible (10-20%) portion of operations where AI will perform poorly or simply fail. These situations will continue to require a human to make the overall system work successfully. In a previous academy talk, I discussed how best to use a human not only in these situations but many others as well. In this talk I will expand on certain aspects of human/machine teaming including how to make the most of your machine.<br><br>About the Presenter:<br>Paul Schutte is a Principal researcher in Human-Machine Teaming in Applied Cognitive Science at Sandia National Laboratories in NM. He has worked at Sandia for 5 years. He is currently leading research efforts in Human Machine Teaming with regard to Foundation Models (e.g., GPT) and Machine Learning, Function Allocation, Trust, and Transparency. Prior to Sandia, he worked 35 years for NASA LaRC developing AI decision aids and cockpit interfaces for commercial aviation. He has expertise in Human-Machine Teaming, Naturalistic Decision Making, Function Allocation, and Aviation. Schutte has a MS in Experimental Psychology and an MS in Computer Science.
In-Space Rescue
Presenter Dr. Grant Cates
Published July 2023
Recorded July 2023
Duration 01:41:07
Tags #Fundamental, .Analysis / Modeling and Simulation, .Operations, .Lessons Learned, ~Space Shuttle, ~Skylab, ~Artemis Mission, ~Apollo, ~Human Space Exploration, ~Space Rescue, ~Submarine Rescue, ~International Docking System Standard
Discipline: Systems Engineering<br><br>Abstract:<br>This presentation will provide an overview of the current in-space rescue capability gap along with analogies to maritime explorers, submarine rescue, and past plans for space rescue. Existing capabilities are summarized, space rescue scenarios are described and recommendations are provided.<br><br>About the Speaker:<br>Grant Cates is a Senior Project Leader at The Aerospace Corporation. Prior to joining Aerospace in 2014, he was a Chief Scientist at SAIC. He retired from NASA in 2006 after 25 combined years in federal service, including 7 years on active duty in the Air Force. At NASA he served in varying capacities on the Space Shuttle Program, including Space Shuttle Columbia Vehicle Manager and Flow Director. He received a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from the University of Central Florida in 2004.
X-Ray Vision: Exploring The Hidden Universe
Presenter Dr. Jessica Gaskin
Published July 2023
Recorded February 2023
Duration 01:00:32
Tags None
Abstract:<br>NASA's goal in Astrophysics is to "Discover how the universe works, explore how it began and evolved, and search for life on planets around other stars." Addressing this ambitious goal requires a large astrophysics fleet that is capable of observing the universe in multiple wavelengths. This talk will focus on our ability to view X-rays emanating from some of the most extreme environments in space using full-shell grazing incidence optics flying on suborbital and space-based platforms.
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Reusable TPS: Past, Present and Future
Presenter Dr. Adam Caldwell
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:03:03
Tags None
Aerodynamics and Performance Flight Research and Airworthiness Best Practices
Presenter Stephen Cumming
Published June 2023
Recorded July 2023
Duration 23:13
Tags #Intermediate, #Advanced, .Analysis / Modeling and Simulation, .Testing, .Lessons Learned, ~Flight Mechanics, ~Aerodynamics, ~Aircraft Performance, ~Air Data Systems, ~Airworthiness, ~Computational Fluid Dynamics, ~Parameter Identification
Discipline: Flight Mechanics<br><br>Abstract: <br>This presentation discussion best practices and lessons learned for flight research and airworthiness with respect to the aerodynamics and performance disciplines. Preflight analyses, instrumentation, flight test techniques, and post flight analyses are all discussed. Specific examples of lessons learned from previous flight research efforts are provided and best practices for future flight research are suggested.<br><br>Presenter Bio: <br>Stephen Cumming is currently the Assistant Branch Head for the Aerothermodynamics Branch at NASA Langley Research Center and serves as a senior advisor to the Scientifically Calibrated In-Flight Imagery (SCIFLI) team. He joined NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (now NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center) in 2004 and was a member of the Aerodynamics and Propulsion branch for 18 years, focusing on flight research and test aerodynamics, including aerodynamic modeling, in-flight measurements, and aircraft acoustics. Throughout his career, Stephen served as a lead research engineer on various projects, including Active<br>Aeroelastic Wing (AAW), F-15B Quiet Spike, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), and Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE). He served as the Branch Chief of the Aerodynamics and Propulsion Branch at NASA Armstrong for seven years prior to transferring to NASA Langley in 2022. He received a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering and a master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from Cornell University.<br>
NESC Knowledge Products
Presenter NESC Academy
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 02:33
Tags None
Capturing and preserving critical knowledge for the future.<br><br>The NESC is engaged in activities to identify, retain, and share critical knowledge in order to meet our future challenges. To disseminate that knowledge to engineers – within NASA, industry, and academia – the NESC develops a wide variety of knowledge products that can be readily accessed including technical assessment reports, technical bulletins, video libraries, and more.
Past Discrete Event Simulations – A Summary of Past Lunar, Asteroid, and Mars Mission Campaign Analyses
Presenter Dr. Grant Cates
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:08:09
Tags #Intermediate, #Advanced, #Fundamental, .Analysis / Modeling and Simulation, .Operations, ~Discreet Event Simulation, ~Launch Campaigns, ~On-Orbit Assembly, ~Risk Analysis, ~Human Space Exploration, ~Concept of Operations (CONOPS)
Instructions:<br>- Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur.<br>- Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder.<br>- Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible.<br>- Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end.<br>- Enjoy!<br><br>Abstract: <br>This presentation will provide a very brief introduction to discrete event simulation and then provide detailed examples of how discrete event simulations were used to analyze the concept of operations for crewed lunar, asteroid and Mars exploration missions.<br><br>About the Presenter:<br>Grant Cates is a Senior Project Leader at The Aerospace Corporation. Prior to joining Aerospace in 2014, he was a Chief Scientist at SAIC. He retired from NASA in 2006 after 25 combined years in federal service, including 7 years on active duty in the Air Force. At NASA he served in varying capacities on the Space Shuttle Program, including Space Shuttle Columbia Vehicle Manager and Flow Director. He received a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from the University of Central Florida in 2004.
Crew Health and Performance System Probabilistic Risk Assessment (Chp-Pra): Proof-of-Concept Approach
Presenter Lauren McIntyre
Published June 2023
Recorded September 2021
Duration 58:24
Tags #Intermediate, .Analysis / Modeling and Simulation, ~Modeling and Simulation, ~Crew Performance, ~Crew Health, ~Probabilistic Risk Assessment, ~Monte Carlo, ~Risk Quantification, ~Long Term Health
Discipline: Human Factors<br><br>This presentation will give an overview of the proof-of-concept approaching being taken to quantify Crew Health and Performance (CHP) risk. By leveraging existing, robust tools for medical risk quantification (MEDPRAT), we present an approach for integrating CHP system capabilities in a manner consistent with other NASA risk characterizations that allows for trades on mass and volume.
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: LOFTID Flight Summary
Presenter Greg Swanson
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:25:55
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: A Multi-Probe Mission at Jupiter is Within our Reach
Presenter Ethiraj Venkatapathy
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:23:42
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: An Introduction to Machine Learning With EDL Applications
Presenter James B. Scoggins
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:22:39
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Advanced Computational Center for Entry System Simulation
Presenter Iain Boyd
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 58:45
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Future Flight of Mars
Presenter Haley Cummings
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 49:06
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Supersonic Retropopulsion: Technology Status, Wind Tunnel Testing and CFD Analysis
Presenter Ashley Korzun
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:05:40
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Certification by Analysis of Woven TPS: Fiber - and Weave-Scale Modeling
Presenter Lauren Abbott
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:12:26
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: A Multi-Architecture for Implicit Computational Fluid Dynamics on Unstructured Grids
Presenter Gabriel Nastac
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 57:23
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: The Mars Launch System: Introduction and Aerosciences Overview
Presenter Ashley Carp
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:12:32
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: A Reduced Order Modeling Approach for the Dynamic Stability Analysis of Blunt-Body Entry Vehicles
Presenter Brad Robertson
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:13:31
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: DAVINCI: The Big Plunge into Venus
Presenter Soumyo Dutta
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 58:06
Tags None
2023 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: EDL State of the Union
Presenter Michelle Munk
Published June 2023
Recorded June 2023
Duration 01:02:08
Tags None
Lunar Dust & Dust Mitigation
Presenter Kristen John
Published May 2023
Recorded May 2023
Duration 54:24
Tags None
Inverse Estimation of Mars 2020 Entry Aeroheating Environments Using MEDLI2 Flight Data
Presenter Hannah Alpert
Published May 2023
Recorded November 2022
Duration 36:50
Tags None
Development of a Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis (PUMA)
Presenter Dr. Daniel Dietrich
Published May 2023
Recorded April 2023
Duration 58:10
Tags None
Abstract:<br>Understanding an individual’s metabolic rate is important in a wide range of terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. For extraterrestrial applications, devices to measure metabolic rate should be compact, low power, and require little maintenance and/or calibration. This presentation discusses the effort to develop a new portable metabolic device (PUMA - Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. PUMA is a battery-operated, wearable unit to measure metabolic rate (minute ventilation, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output and heart rate) in a clinical setting, in the field or in remote, extreme environments. The critical sensors in PUMA that measure oxygen, carbon dioxide and ventilatory flow are located close to the mouth and sampled at 10 Hz to allow intra-breath measurements. The engineering efforts to develop PUMA will be presented, followed by limited validation studies of the final device. Finally, the application of PUMA and the underlying technologies for a range of applications will be presented.
Gecko Mobility Aids for A Common Habitat Architecture
Presenter Dr. Robert Howard
Published May 2023
Recorded March 2023
Duration 42:30
Tags None
Instructions:<br>- Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur.<br>- Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder.<br>- Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible.<br>- Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end.<br>- Enjoy!<br><br>Abstract:<br>“Spacecraft large enough for crew to move around inside them have traditionally used handrails and foot restraints to enable crew mobility. The mass of this hardware can become significant in large spacecraft such as the Common Habitat. Additionally, handrails and foot restraints in a multi-gravity habitat are trip hazards when the habitat is in a gravity environment. Further, ISS crew have noted risks of breaking ankles and wrists when using handrails for translation and have noted places where not enough handrails are present. Robotic gecko-derived grippers developed by JPL to retrieve satellites can be adapted to crew-worn pads that can adhere to surfaces to enable crew translation in microgravity. <br><br>This technology will help to eliminate the need for handrails and foot restraints for mobility in crewed microgravity spacecraft cabins. It has the potential to achieve significant mass reductions in future space habitats, with application to suborbital flight, LEO, cislunar space, interplanetary space, the Moon, and Mars. Additionally, it can prevent crew injury and discomfort. Project goals and objectives are to prepare gecko uniform prototypes for use in multi-gravity testing and conduct initial investigations into human factors of postures and motions needed for intravehicular activity (IVA) translation and restraint in multiple gravity environments, without the use of handrails or foot restraints. Gecko grippers have been tested for use as robotic end effectors terrestrially, on microgravity aircraft, and aboard the ISS.<br><br>Using the grippers as a body-mounted system to achieve IVA crew mobility is a new application that has not been pursued outside of this effort. This work will continue paper studies performed by NASA student interns by developing physical prototypes of spacecraft crew uniforms with gecko-derived body-mounted grippers. Clothing prototypes may include long sleeves, short sleeves, long pants, shorts, gloves, and/or booties equipped with gecko gripper pads. Forward work is to test these uniforms in a 1g environment to verify that the design does not introduce obstructions, trip hazards, or other consequences when used in terrestrial gravity. Based on the 1g test results, the uniform prototypes will be refined, and a test plan developed for testing at 0g, (1/6)g, and (3/8)g.
Lunar Thermal Analysis Guidebook, Part 3
Presenter Carlos Gomez
Published May 2023
Recorded March 2023
Duration 01:20:35
Tags None
Lunar Thermal Analysis Guidebook, Part 2
Presenter Carlos Gomez
Published May 2023
Recorded March 2023
Duration 01:02:00
Tags None
Overview of Spacecraft Thermal Control, Part 1: Introduction
Presenter David Gilmore
Published May 2023
Recorded July 2022
Duration 28:32
Tags #Fundamental, .Systems / Subsystems
About the speaker:<br>David G. Gilmore is a Senior Engineering Specialist in the Spacecraft Thermal Department at The Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, California. Mr. Gilmore has acquired over 40 years of experience in the design, analysis, test, and flight operations of spacecraft thermal control systems. He has provided support to a wide range of scientific, commercial, and military spacecraft programs. In addition to his activities at The Aerospace Corporation, he is also the editor and a contributing author of the Spacecraft Thermal Control Handbook.
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) For Capsule Design
Presenter Dinesh Prabhu
Published May 2023
Recorded February 2023
Duration 01:47:54
Tags None
Lunar Thermal Analysis Guidebook, Part 1
Presenter Carlos Gomez
Published May 2023
Recorded March 2023
Duration 01:26:24
Tags None
Passive Cryogenic Fluid Management, Part 2
Presenter Matt Moran
Published May 2023
Recorded April 2023
Duration 01:18:33
Tags None
Passive Cryogenic Fluid Management, Part 1
Presenter Matt Moran
Published May 2023
Recorded April 2023
Duration 01:22:39
Tags None
How Software Fails
Presenter Lorraine Prokop
Published April 2023
Recorded March 2023
Duration 14:02
Tags #Fundamental, #State of the Art, .Design, .Testing, .Operations, .Environments, .Systems / Subsystems, ~Software Design, ~Framework, ~Reuse
How to Unit Test and Use GCOV for MC/DC
Presenter Lorraine Prokop
Published April 2023
Recorded March 2023
Duration 16:18
Tags #Fundamental, #State of the Art, .Design, .Testing, .Operations, .Environments, .Systems / Subsystems, ~Software Design, ~Framework, .~Reuse
What is MC/DC
Presenter Lorraine Prokop
Published April 2023
Recorded March 2023
Duration 14:38
Tags #Fundamental, .Design, .Testing, ~Software Design, ~Safety Critical Systems, ~Testing, ~Unit Test, ~Code Coverage
Up Close and Personal with Hank Rotter Jr.
Presenter Hank Rotter Jr.
Published April 2023
Recorded July 2022
Duration 01:13:15
Tags None
NASA Spacecraft TRaDe Modeling System (NSTRDMS)
Presenter Scott Karn
Published April 2023
Recorded January 2023
Duration 39:54
Tags None
Abstract:<br>A rapid mission analysis tool is developed to support the ongoing design of a Lunar Transit trajectory of the Power and Propulsion Element (PPE) between a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) parking orbit and a lunar L2 southern Near Rectilinear Halo Orbit (NRHO). A parameterization is developed by which the Lunar Transit can be analyzed in the context of varying vehicle mass, solar electric propulsion (SEP) configurations, and solar array power output. A rapid and novel mission analysis tool enables a wide array of these trade analyses to be completed without the need for extensive computing resources or time.
Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)
Presenter Dr. Robert Scully
Published March 2023
Recorded April 2023
Duration 05:21:37
Tags None
OpenMDAO: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Derivatives
Presenter Rob Falck
Published March 2023
Recorded April 2023
Duration 39:48
Tags None
Sensors Used For Hot Fire Testing of Rocket Engines
Presenter Pablo Gomez
Published March 2023
Recorded February 2023
Duration 01:00:38
Tags None
Abstract:<br>Rocket engines and their components are tested to validate models and reduce mission risks. The quality of the data collected largely depends on the types of signal conditioning and sensors used in the process. Since the 1960's, Stennis Space Center (SSC) has been NASA's leading center for testing Rocket Stages, Rocket engines and rocket engine components. Throughout this time, SSC has developed best practices on how to deal with sensor shortcomings and increase their reliability. This paper explains the operation of the most common sensors used, their pros and cons, and their uncertainties. Additionally, it covers the in-place calibration of the facility propellant flowmeters which cannot be removed and sent to be calibrated at a lab on a regular basis.
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: EDL State of the Union
Presenter Michelle Munk
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 51:48
Tags None
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Porous Microstructure Analysis (PuMA)
Presenter Federico Semeraro
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 59:48
Tags None
Abstract:<br>This talk discusses the capabilities of an open-source, NASA-developed software called Porous Microstructure Analysis (PuMA). The code was developed to provide a robust and efficient framework for computing material properties based on 3D microstructures. The development was motivated by advancements in X-ray microtomography, an imaging technology that can resolve the structure of a material at a sub-micron scale, in 3D and even in 4D (over time). At NASA, this technique has provided unprecedented insights into materials relevant for different missions, from heat shields, to parachute fabrics, to meteorites and other advanced composites. PuMA provides the ability to compute a comprehensive spectrum of material properties, from the most fundamental geometric features of a microstructure, to advanced anisotropic thermo-elastic and chemical properties. In addition, the software can generate artificial microstructures, including complex fibrous woven and non-woven geometries, allowing to perform optimization studies that inform the design of new materials.
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Backshell Radiative Heating and its Application to Mars 2020
Presenter Chris Johnston
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 59:02
Tags None
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Scientifically Calibrated In-Flight Imagery
Presenter Carey Scott
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 01:29:40
Tags None
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: STMD Early Career Initiative
Presenter Soumyo Dutta
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 01:13:26
Tags None
Piloted Simulation Based Assessment of Simplified Vehicle Operations for Urban Air Mobility
Presenter Dr. Imon Chakraborty
Published March 2023
Recorded February 2023
Duration 01:00:24
Tags None
Abstract:<br>The Simplified Vehicle Operations paradigm seeks to achieve significant reductions in pilot workload and training requirements through the holistic design of flight control laws, control inceptors, and cockpit displays. This talk investigates the paradigm in the context of vertical takeoff and landing urban air mobility flight vehicle concepts using piloted flight simulations. Two inceptor designs, differing in the physical design of the inceptors and in the inceptor-to-command mappings, are evaluated using two flight simulators and study participants with varying prior aviation experience.<br><br>Part three of a three part series.<br>
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Analysis 101: Intro to DSMC
Presenter Dr. Arnaud Borner
Published March 2023
Recorded July 2022
Duration 01:12:16
Tags None
Day 1.4 International, Inter-Agency, & Academic Mission Participation
Presenter Mark Klein Wolt
Published March 2023
Recorded September 2022
Duration 01:55:05
Tags None
Unique Science from the Moon in the Artemis Era Workshop (June 7-9, 2022) at Kennedy Space Center<br><br>Day 1. Part 4 Agenda:<br>Round table discussion - Moderated by Jack Burns (Webex moderator: Mark Matsumura)<br>o International participation – Marc Klein-Wolt (Radboud University, Netherlands)<br>o Inter-Agency activities with DoE – Anže Slosar (Brookhaven National Lab)<br>o Spectrum Environment and Management for Radio Observations – Cathy Sham (NASA<br>Lunar Spectrum Manager)<br>o Site Selection for Radio Telescopes – Jack Burns (U. of Colorado)<br>o Discussion
Day 3.1 Overview of LunaNet & Worksite Design and Lighting
Presenter James Schier
Published March 2023
Recorded September 2022
Duration 01:09:24
Tags None
Unique Science from the Moon in the Artemis Era Workshop (June 7-9, 2022) at Kennedy Space Center<br><br>Day 3. Part 1 Agenda:<br>o Communication & Navigation – Jim Schier (NASA HQ) et al.<br>o LunaNet Overview<br>o Worksite Design and Lighting – Charlie Dischinger et al. (NASA MSFC)<br>Engineering challenges summary and risk mitigation approaches
Day 2.2 Power Generational Storage & Human Intervention Challenges with Assembly & Servicing of Scientific Experiments
Presenter Ryan Edwards
Published March 2023
Recorded September 2022
Duration 02:51:09
Tags None
Unique Science from the Moon in the Artemis Era Workshop (June 7-9, 2022) at Kennedy Space Center<br><br>Day 2. Part 2 Agenda:<br>Challenges of the Lunar environment - Moderated by Jon Haas (Webex moderators: Tim<br>Brady and John Hanson)<br>o Power Generation and Storage – Ryan Edwards (NASA GRC) et al.<br>o Lessons Learned for Instrument Design & Deployment from Apollo Era - Harrison<br>Schmitt
Day 1.1 Workshop Introduction & Overview of Lunar Discovery Exploration and Artemis Program
Presenter Azita Valinia
Published March 2023
Recorded September 2022
Duration 01:43:50
Tags None
Unique Science from the Moon in the Artemis Era Workshop (June 7-9, 2022) at Kennedy Space Center<br><br>Day 1, Part 1 Agenda:<br>Objectives of the workshop and deliverables – Azita Valinia (NESC Chief Scientist)<br>Lunar Discovery & Exploration Program and Near-term Artemis Science – Joel Kearns<br>(Deputy Associate Administrator for Exploration, NASA Science Mission Directorate)<br>Overview of Artemis Program… and how it enables science – Jake Bleacher (NASA HQ)<br>Unique Science from the Moon Overview – Jim Green (NASA)
Day 1.2 LuSEE & FARSIDE - Science Concept Case Studies
Presenter Stuart Bale
Published March 2023
Recorded September 2022
Duration 01:21:19
Tags None
Unique Science from the Moon in the Artemis Era Workshop (June 7-9, 2022) at Kennedy Space Center <br><br>Day 1. Part 2 Agenda:<br><br>Science Concept Case Studies already funded by NASA SMD & STMD – Moderated by<br>Nick White (Webex moderator: Mark Matsumura)<br><br>Focus is on low frequency radio telescope concepts that is identified as an area of discovery in<br>Astro2020 and currently of high interest to both NASA and DoE, as well as heliophysics science<br>applications.<br><br>1. LuSEE – Stuart Bale (U. of California, Berkeley)<br>2. FARSIDE – Jack Burns (U. of Colorado, Boulder)<br>
Day 3.2 Capabilities & Infrastructure and Drivers for Artemis Systems Requirements
Presenter John Grunsfeld
Published March 2023
Recorded September 2022
Duration 01:32:01
Tags None
Unique Science from the Moon in the Artemis Era Workshop (June 7-9, 2022) at Kennedy Space Center<br><br>Day 3. Part 2 Agenda:<br>Engineering Challenges and Discussion – Led by Jon Haas (Webex moderators: Tim Brady<br>and John Hanson) <br>Engineering challenges summary and risk mitigation approaches<br>Capabilities and Infrastructure Summary and Discussion – Led by John Grunsfeld & Mike<br>Hess (Webex moderators: Mark Terrone and Chris Broadaway)<br><br>Robotics delivery (CLPS), what could CLPS 2.0 look like in 2030+? (assembly and servicing of<br>experiments using a combination of robotics and human intervention)<br>o Astronaut assembly and servicing (Artemis)<br>o Sustained presence capabilities (Artemis Base Camp)<br>o In Situ Utilization applied to science<br>o Maintaining radio quiet environment<br>o Robotic vs human development of science facilities (trades and benefits)<br> - What is the role of humans in the process?<br> - How much value do humans add in the process? Risk and cost<br> comparison?<br>o Sensors and instrumentation - Buildup & Planning, Operations, Clean-up Drivers for Artemis Systems Requirement and Discussion – Led by Renee Weber &<br>Nick White (Webex moderator: Mark Matsumura)<br>o Leveraging the Artemis infrastructure<br>o Spectrum of robotic vs human assembly and servicing<br>o Engineering Challenges: Knowledge gaps<br>o Required investments<br><br>
Day 1.3 Lunar Crater Radio Telescope (LCRT) & FarView - Science Concept Case Studies
Presenter Saptarshi Bandyopadhyay
Published March 2023
Recorded September 2022
Duration 47:31
Tags None
Unique Science from the Moon in the Artemis Era Workshop (June 7-9, 2022) at Kennedy Space Center <br><br>Day 1. Part 3 Agenda:<br><br>Science Concept Case Studies already funded by NASA SMD & STMD – Moderated by<br>Nick White (Webex moderator: Mark Matsumura)<br><br>Focus is on low frequency radio telescope concepts that is identified as an area of discovery in<br>Astro2020 and currently of high interest to both NASA and DoE, as well as heliophysics science<br>applications.<br>- Lunar Crater Radio Telescope (LCRT) – Saptarshi Bandyopadhyay (JPL)<br>- FarView – Ron Polidan (Lunar Resources Inc.)<br>- Discussion<br>
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Introduction to Plume-Surface Interaction (PSI)
Presenter Ashley Korzun
Published March 2023
Recorded July 2022
Duration 01:18:37
Tags None
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Decadal Survey / Future Science Priorities
Presenter Ethiraj Venkatapathy
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 01:15:47
Tags None
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Commercial Crew
Presenter Lindsay Kirk
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 01:03:22
Tags None
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Brief Summary of EDL GNC
Presenter Soumyo Dutta
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 01:06:08
Tags None
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Artemis Human Landing System Deorbit, Descent, and Landing
Presenter Alicia Dwyer-Cianciolo
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 55:40
Tags None
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: AETC Descent System Studies
Presenter Karl Edquist
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 01:11:29
Tags None
2022 NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Parachute Simulation
Presenter Francios Cadieux
Published March 2023
Recorded June 2022
Duration 01:07:49
Tags None
Total Energy based Flight Control System Architecture for a Lift-Plus-Cruise Urban Air Mobility Aircraft
Presenter Dr. Imon Chakraborty
Published March 2023
Recorded February 2023
Duration 01:01:47
Tags None
Abstract:<br>This talk deals with the development and optimization of a flight control system for a lift-plus-cruise urban air mobility aircraft that is based on the Total Energy Control System algorithm. The Modular Aircraft Dynamics and Control Algorithm Simulation Platform (MADCASP) framework is used to implement the aircraft simulation model and the flight control laws, whose parameters are then optimized. Maneuver simulations are analyzed to assess the behavior of the flight control system in preparation for subsequent piloted simulations.<br><br>Part two of a three part series.<br>
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Human Systems Integration of the Mars Ascent Vehicle
Presenter Tanya Andrews
Published February 2023
Recorded February 2023
Duration 01:01:15
Tags None
Instructions:<br>- Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur.<br>- Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder.<br>- Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible.<br>- Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end.<br>- Enjoy!<br><br>Abstract:<br>The Mars Sample Return Campaign is a complex system, that includes two landers and two rovers, an orbiting return vehicle, and  the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for MAV and is working  with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Lockheed Martin to complete this part of the multi-year campaign.  Human Systems Integration (HSI) of the MAV is paving the way for HSI in unmanned missions, as MAV is one of the first projects to officially be mandated to have an HSI plan, as directed through NASA Procedural Requirements.  The Marshall HSI lead has needed to be flexible and innovative, in the face of changing requirements and evolving management strategies.  <br><br>The HSI plan has had to be adaptive to these changes, while continuing to be useful and valuable to the SE team and to project management.  The fact that the project has continued to rely on the HSI approach, despite outside argument that this focus was unnecessary, has only proven the value of HSI in such systems.  This presentation highlights the plan and the path that led to the current status.
Sizing and Optimization of a Lift-Plus-Cruise Urban Air Mobility Concept with Electrified Propulsion
Presenter Dr. Imon Chakraborty
Published February 2023
Recorded February 2023
Duration 57:35
Tags None
This talk describes sizing of a lift-plus-cruise urban air mobility aircraft with all-electric, hybrid-electric, and turbo-electric propulsion systems using the Parametric Energy-based Aircraft Configuration Evaluator (PEACE) framework. The PEACE framework was developed at the Vehicle Systems, Dynamics and Design Laboratory (VSDDL) to allow sizing and performance analysis of novel configurations and propulsion system architectures. After assessing the sensitivities of the sized design to mission range and technology state-of-the-art, multi-objective optimization is performed using a genetic algorithm for a set of sizing scenarios.
Engineering Materials and Metrology Tools for Thermal Management
Presenter Amy Marconnet
Published January 2023
Recorded January 2023
Duration 59:00
Tags None
Abstract:<br>As researchers develop new materials and systems, thermal transport is often key to performance, safety, and reliability. For instance, in battery cells, interfaces and low conductivity pathways can lead to high temperatures that can lead to thermal runaway. In portable and wearable electronics, limited heat dissipation pathways lead either to temperatures that require throttling device performance or that degrade the system. The Marconnet Thermal & Energy Conversion (MTEC) Lab focuses on (1) the design, development, and validation of novel experimental metrology tools for characterizing multi-functional properties of materials across length and temperature scales; (2) enhanced understanding and control of fundamental transport and energy conversion mechanisms through multi-scale computational modeling; and (3) strategic, physics-based design and development of materials with multi-functional capabilities. <br><br>This talk will describe several recent examples from my group of engineering materials to achieve targeted performance objectives, along with the development of new metrology tools for understanding thermal transport. We build from steady state to transient and high-powered heat dissipation systems for electronics cooling and other applications illustrating combined experimental and modeling approaches. These current and past projects provide a foundation for our new research directions related to thermal transport and energy storage.<br>
Microfluidic Sensing Systems to Study and Seek Microbes Beyond Earth
Presenter Dr. Antonio Joseph Ricco
Published January 2023
Recorded December 2022
Duration 01:01:19
Tags None
Abstract:<br>We develop miniaturized integrated bio/analytical instruments and platforms to conduct economical, frequent, autonomous life-science experiments in outer space. The technologies of our multiple “free-flyer” cubesat missions are the basis of a rapidly growing suite of miniaturized biologically- and chemically-oriented instrumentation now enabling a new generation of in-situ space science experiments. Over the past decade, our missions have included studies of space-environment-related changes in gene expression, drug dose response, microbial longevity and metabolism, and the degradation of biomarker molecules. The science and technology of the GeneSat (2006) and BioSentinel (2022, via Artemis-1) missions will be highlighted in the context of conducting biological and chemical experiments in outer space using miniaturized integrated systems.<br> We also adapt and apply our spaceflight-compatible microfluidic and bioanalytical technologies to the challenge of finding molecular and structural indications of microbial life on the so-called icy worlds of our solar system, particularly the moons Enceladus and Europa. The Sample Processor for Life on Icy Worlds (SPLIce) system, a microfluidic sample-processing “front end” to enable autonomous detection of signatures of life and measurements of habitability parameters on icy worlds, will be described. SPLIce is under development to support several mission scenarios, including a fly-through of Enceladus’ icy plumes, expected to yield ~ 2 µL of ice particles, and a Europan lander, the sampling system of which is anticipated to deliver 1 – 5 mL of icy solids for analysis. <br>
Pointing Error Metrics Workshop Part 4: Pointing Performance Analysis
Presenter Dr. Mark Pittelkau
Published January 2023
Recorded September 2021
Duration 03:29:01
Tags None
Abstract:<br>The purpose of this Workshop is to inform practicing GN&C engineers, system engineers, and payload instrument engineers of advanced methodologies for analyzing the pointing performance of spacecraft and writing unambiguous pointing requirements that are relevant to performance of optical payloads, especially payloads with stringent pointing stability and jitter requirements. Another purpose of this Workshop is to provide techniques that can help attitude control and spacecraft system engineers understand the relationship between the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) and pointing errors. In this Workshop, rigorous mathematical definitions of displacement, smear, and jitter will be presented, and smear and jitter metrics incorporating key elements of optical engineering will be derived.
Rapid Thermal Design, Modeling, and Analysis of Spaceflight Instruments, Part 3
Presenter Kan Yang
Published January 2023
Recorded November 2022
Duration 26:20
Tags instrument, rapid, conceptual, model, spacecraft design, testing and performance
This course provides a general overview of how to conduct rapid instrument thermal design, modeling, and analysis, as informed by the processes in NASA’s design labs.
Rapid Thermal Design, Modeling, and Analysis of Spaceflight Instruments, Part 2
Presenter Kan Yang
Published January 2023
Recorded November 2022
Duration 26:58
Tags instrument, rapid, conceptual, model, spacecraft design, testing and performance
This course provides a general overview of how to conduct rapid instrument thermal design, modeling, and analysis, as informed by the processes in NASA’s design labs.
Rapid Thermal Design, Modeling, and Analysis of Spaceflight Instruments, Part 1
Presenter Kan Yang
Published January 2023
Recorded November 2022
Duration 05:13
Tags instrument, rapid, conceptual, model, spacecraft design, testing and performance
This course provides a general overview of how to conduct rapid instrument thermal design, modeling, and analysis, as informed by the processes in NASA’s design labs.
Pointing Error Metrics Workshop Part 3: Requirements Definitions, Flowdown, Interfaces, Model Updates
Presenter Dr. Mark Pittelkau
Published January 2023
Recorded September 2021
Duration 43:46
Tags None
Abstract:<br>The purpose of this Workshop is to inform practicing GN&C engineers, system engineers, and payload instrument engineers of advanced methodologies for analyzing the pointing performance of spacecraft and writing unambiguous pointing requirements that are relevant to performance of optical payloads, especially payloads with stringent pointing stability and jitter requirements. Another purpose of this Workshop is to provide techniques that can help attitude control and spacecraft system engineers understand the relationship between the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) and pointing errors. In this Workshop, rigorous mathematical definitions of displacement, smear, and jitter will be presented, and smear and jitter metrics incorporating key elements of optical engineering will be derived.
Pointing Error Metrics Workshop Part 2: Image Motion Optical Transfer Functions (IM OTF)