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Development of a Venus Surface Wind Sensor
Presenter John Wrbanek
Published May 2022
Recorded April 2022
Duration 00:00
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: To better understand the atmospheric structure and dynamics on the Venus surface and provide input to climate models, there is a need to measure the wind velocity and direction on the surface and track changes over extended periods. A wind sensor based on a miniature drag-force anemometer is being developed to meet the challenges for wind measurements and operational requirements on the surface of Venus. The sensor materials are chosen to enhance durability and prevent reactivity with the Venus surface atmosphere. Advantages of this approach include that it is independent of variable heat transfer, has been matured in other harsh environment applications, and has a low mass and power requirement. Prototype drag-force anemometers were demonstrated, integrated with a high-temperature operational amplifier, recording transient effects in a simulated Venus surface environment. For multidirectional wind monitoring, the sensors are small enough to be deployed orthogonally as a three-dimensional array on a small arm or mast. This presentation describes the development and demonstration of this miniature drag-force anemometer integrated with high temperature electronics in a simulated Venus surface environment.
Facilitating (and not Interfering with) Work System Resilience with New Technology
Presenter Emily Patterson
Published May 2022
Recorded April 2022
Duration 58:07
Tags None
Traditionally, the negative unintended consequences of introducing new technologies into complex systems have not been explicitly assessed and mitigated. Recently, our understanding of how to identify, protect, and facilitate sources of resilience in a work system has advanced. In particular, there are lessons learned from two case studies of technologies: 1) voice loops, an auditory shared space that supported NASA Johnson communication and coordination, and 2) the introduction of bar coding in the medication administration process throughout the Veteran’s Health Administration. BCMA was designed to improve patient safety by reducing medication errors at the time of medication administration. During and after implementation, there were unintended consequences on the ability of work systems to: 1) have a shared awareness of demands and deviations, 2) progressively respond to changing circumstances, 3) guide local control with policies and procedures, 4) flexibly adapt by reducing constraints on actions, and 5) coordinate across the system.
Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation
Presenter Jose Santos
Published April 2022
Recorded April 2022
Duration 01:07:10
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: The Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of a scientific mission to a planetary body involving atmospheric flight is critical because the spacecraft must survive the extreme environment it encounters as it traverses the atmosphere. Mission designers must ensure the spacecraft's Thermal Protection System (TPS) can adequately protect the spacecraft, and the scientific payloads it carries. The EDL sequence is often regarded to be among the riskiest parts of the mission because there is little to no opportunity to take corrective action if a problem or anomaly is encountered. The Thermal Protection System is a single point of failure, and its design involves a robust sizing and margins process. Engineering instrumentation embedded within the Thermal Protection System provides valuable flight data to support verification and validation of analysis and simulation tools that are used for TPS design. This presentation will give an overview of in-situ EDL instrumentation used in atmospheric entry vehicles. Examples of different sensor types and recent instrumentation flown on NASA missions within the past decade will be presented, including the instrumentation suites flown on the Mars Science Laboratory, Mars 2020, and Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 missions. In addition, instrumentation that will fly on the Artemis 1 and 2, and Dragonfly missions will be described. Furthermore, sensor measurement accuracy and/or resolution for the current state-of-the-art, along with future needs, will also be discussed.
Success in Spaceflight: The Human System
Presenter Andrew Chaikin
Published April 2022
Recorded March 2022
Duration 01:03:34
Tags None
Instructions: - Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur. - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: What are the keys to success in spaceflight projects? What are the causes of failure? In this most unforgiving of human endeavors, the surprising answer is that the “rocket science” isn’t the hardest part. Ultimately, it comes down to how we think about the work, and the human behaviors that shape how we do the work. Success is critically dependent on such variables as whether or not we maintain a balance between ego and humility, and whether we remain open to new information that conflicts with our world view. It hinges on whether we indulge—even unconsciously—in all-too-common human behaviors like false perception of risk, hubris, groupthink, and that bane of technical organizations called the Not Invented Here syndrome. In spaceflight, we cannot afford those indulgences: They can be fatal. Fortunately, there are time-tested modes of thinking and behaviors that enhance our chances for success, when we choose to rigorously employ them.
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Orion Multi-Purpose Crew
Presenter Adam Amar
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:31:54
Tags None
Recorded July 9, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Propulsive Descent Technologies
Presenter Ashley Korzun
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:26:53
Tags None
Recorded August 2, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Material Response Modeling
Presenter Eric Stern
Published March 2022
Recorded October 2021
Duration 01:24:26
Tags None
Recorded July 12, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Wind Tunnel Testing Lecture
Presenter Brian Hollis
Published March 2022
Recorded August 2021
Duration 01:00:34
Tags None
Recorded July 29, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Mars Sample Return
Presenter Jim Corliss
Published March 2022
Recorded July 2021
Duration 01:15:00
Tags None
Recorded July 1, 2021
Mars Ascent Vehicle GNC Targeting Routines with Considerations for Flight Software Development
Presenter Jason Everett
Published March 2022
Recorded January 2022
Duration 01:02:01
Tags None
The Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) will be the first vehicle to perform an ascent from the surface of another atmospheric planetary body outside of the Earth‐Moon system. Significant light‐time delay requires complete autonomy of flight throughout ascent, and naturally a high level of reliability is desired in both MAV’s hardware and software subsystems. The MAV Guidance, Navigation and Controls (GNC) team and the MAV Flight Software (FSW) team have partnered together to improve the efficiency of algorithm integration onto the MAV flight processor, and to increase confidence that said integration is successful and without human error. An interface architecture is proposed for the GNC suite that allows both the guidance and navigation subsystems to provide code algorithms directly in C++, and the controls subsystem to provide MATLAB Simulink auto‐coded algorithms. Several continuous integration/deployment (CI/CD) methodologies have been considered for ease of transition of algorithm code from the GNC team to the FSW team. The GNC/FSW teams also worked together to develop a cFS‐friendly wrapper which abstracts the integration of the GNC algorithm code into an interface‐level API that is compatible with cFS. Several iterations of vehicle GNC code have been produced between the GNC/FSW team’s partnership, and this strong interface between these two teams have allowed the GNC/FSW teams to greatly increase confidence of efficient and error‐free implementation of the GNC code onto MAV for a successful flight.
Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS)-2 Instrument Development
Presenter Synthia Tonn
Published March 2022
Recorded March 2022
Duration 57:28
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: The Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS)-2 instrument is a two-band thermal imaging sensor flying on Landsat 9. Like its predecessor TIRS on Landsat 8, TIRS-2 produces radiometrically calibrated, geo-located thermal image data used operationally to monitor water consumption on a field-by-field basis in the U.S. West and internationally, among multiple other uses. This talk will provide an overview of the instrument and how it operates.
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Dragonfly / DrEAM
Presenter Michael Wright
Published March 2022
Recorded July 2021
Duration 01:20:13
Tags None
Recorded June 30, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Aerocapture and Aerogravity Assist
Presenter Soumyo Dutta
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:01:27
Tags None
Recorded August 5, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Entry Systems Modeling
Presenter Michael Barnhardt
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:24:00
Tags None
Recorded August 4, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: CFD 101
Presenter Kyle Thompson
Published March 2022
Recorded August 2021
Duration 01:15:48
Tags None
Recorded June 23, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Introduction To Radiative Heating
Presenter Brett Cruden
Published March 2022
Recorded August 2021
Duration 58:40
Tags None
Recorded July 6, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: High Enthalpy Testing
Presenter Earnest Fretter
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:24:38
Tags None
Recorded July 26, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Aerothermal Environments
Presenter Dinesh Prabhu
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:19:28
Tags None
Recorded July 6, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Computational Materials Modeling
Presenter Justin Haskins
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:21:50
Tags None
Recorded August 9, 2021
Human Centered Design Impact on Habitability and Mission Success
Presenter Michal Ziso
Published March 2022
Recorded March 2022
Duration 59:56
Tags None
Abstract: Architecture and the built environment have the power to influence and shape the way humans think, feel and ultimately perform. Those creating these environments have the power to ensure that the human impact is not only positive, but also one that contributes to habitability and mission success. Despite living in a fast-changing world - whether it be technology, social structures, climate, or human-centric factors - our built environment changes very slowly. This statement is valid on earth, and holds further significance in space. An interdisciplinary human centered design approach, offered by a diverse team of experts, could potentially aid in creating environments that meet the different goals, risks, challenges and astronaut personas for a specific mission. This talk will explore the potential influence of human centered design solutions on habitability and mission success from the perspective of both earth and space. From the efficiency of a standardized common solution to a tailored approach, the talk explores how human factors are incorporated into each
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Aerodynamic Modeling
Presenter Karen Bibb
Published March 2022
Recorded October 2021
Duration 01:27:55
Tags None
Recorded July 21, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: LOFTID
Presenter Dr. Neil Cheatwood
Published March 2022
Recorded July 2021
Duration 01:11:54
Tags None
Recorded July 15, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Overview of EDL at NASA
Presenter Michelle Munk
Published March 2022
Recorded July 2021
Duration 01:17:03
Tags None
Originally recorded June 10, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Trajectories
Presenter Juan Cruz
Published March 2022
Recorded August 2021
Duration 01:20:53
Tags None
Originally recorded June 21, 2021
Printed Devices for On-Demand Manufacturing for Electronics
Presenter Jin-Woo Han
Published February 2022
Recorded January 2022
Duration 56:40
Tags None
Abstract: In Space manufacturing (ISM) is an ongoing activity aimed at on demand manufacturing of various active and passive components and spare parts. NASA has already been operating 3D printers in the International Space Station (ISS) and plans are underway to create the capabilities for 2D printing. In this talk, the on-demand printed electronics activities as a part of NASA ISM program will be presented. An overview of our emerging printed devices including gas sensors, energy storage devices, triboelectric nanogenerators and others will be provided. In addition to printing, devices and integration of the devices into systems, tool development is receiving attention, rightfully so in order to meet the anticipated demands of internet of things (IoT).
The Evolution of Digital Engineering: Future Visions for GNC Model-Based Design
Presenter Ossi Saarela
Published January 2022
Recorded December 2021
Duration 56:55
Tags None
Abstract: This presentation offers a vision how digital engineering, including the careful use of AI, can meet the increased future expectations of higher autonomy, capability and complexity in space systems, including Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC). We discuss how digital engineering, incorporating a model-centric design approach, has the potential to increase both engineering efficiency and mission performance, and present the current state of digital engineering adoption and common limitations. A roadmap for the future which addresses these limitations is explored. Within the digital engineering landscape, the presentation also tackles the role of adaptive systems and AI, which are slowly but surely creeping into our industry, and explores which applications are best suited for their adoption in the immediate future and beyond.
Overview of On Demand Manufacturing of Electronics on the ISS
Presenter Curtis Hill
Published January 2022
Recorded December 2021
Duration 55:33
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: On Demand Manufacturing of Electronics (ODME) is a project that is part of NASA’s In Space Manufacturing suite of projects that is developing on-demand manufacturing capability for the International Space Station and beyond. These capabilities will include on demand manufacturing of metals, electronics, sensors, and the ability to reclaim and recycle for long-term sustainment. ODME is developing new materials and processes for additively manufacturing electronics and sensors in a microgravity environment. The new capabilities will allow NASA to replace and upgrade existing electronic components, and also upgrade systems and sensor networks with on-demand printing capabilities. This is an enabling capability for long-term habitation as well as long-range space missions.
A Structure (and Examples) for Capturing Lessons Learned
Presenter Dr. Jesse Leitner
Published January 2022
Recorded December 2021
Duration 57:04
Tags None
In this talk, we will recommend a structure to be followed for lessons learned, to ensure that they are complete, valid, and based on the root cause(s) of the events, if understood. This structure will be followed up with several examples of lessons that come from electronic part and printed circuit board failures, anomalies, and acceptance challenges.
Human Factors Design Considerations for Complex Systems
Presenter Dr. Daniel Wallace
Published December 2021
Recorded November 2021
Duration 58:13
Tags None
Abstract: Many automated/complex systems are ostensibly created to provide simplifying automation and reduce operator workload and manpower requirements. However, in doing so, designers introduce an increased likelihood of human error and overall system failure when off-nominal conditions arise. When automation is added to a system design the implications of those changes on human performance and human reliability (error potential) are often not understood or assessed. This talk will address human performance considerations when developing complex systems, especially with respect to non-deterministic human behavior under off-nominal conditions. We will also discuss methods for addressing human performance factors in reliability predictions for system modernization and automation.
Launch Vehicle Load Relief: A Historical Perspective and Some New Concepts
Presenter Jeb Orr
Published November 2021
Recorded October 2021
Duration 56:49
Tags None
Instructions: - Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur. - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: A review of historical flight control approaches to launch vehicle load relief is presented, with an emphasis on the capabilities and limitations of acceleration and angle-of-attack feedback schemes. The basic dynamics and control principles of a rigid rocket are used to illustrate trade-offs and design considerations. The control laws used for NASA vehicles such as Saturn I/I-B, Space Shuttle, and Ares I-X are reviewed. It is shown that modern, low-cost strapdown GPS/INS systems, combined with preflight measured winds data, can be used to provide quality estimates of the angle of attack for use in modern load relief schemes.
Design Factors & Safety in Air Transport
Presenter Martin Nijhof
Published November 2021
Recorded October 2021
Duration 01:00:30
Tags None
Instructions: - Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur. - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: Design is omnipresent, and includes both good design and suboptimal, or even poor design. In the aviation domain, suboptimal design can affect the safety of flight. In this presentation a few examples of suboptimal design will be discussed using some case studies. In addition, a few design principles with some example of excellent designs will be presented.
Building Your Second SINDA Model
Presenter Steven L. Rickman
Published November 2021
Recorded February 2021
Duration 42:32
Tags None
The Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer, or SINDA, computer program in one form or another has been a mainstay of thermal analysis for more than 50 years. SINDA is offered by a number of different vendors. While syntax and features may vary from product to product, many of the concepts discussed in this lesson are applicable across numerous versions of SINDA. For this lesson, SINDA/FLUINT by Cullimore and Ring Technologies (C&R Technologies®), Inc. is used. The use of this product in this lesson should not be construed as an endorsement. Finally, data used in this lesson are for demonstration purposes and should not be used for design purposes or to replace use of any project-directed data. It is assumed that you, either, have some familiarity with thermal network modeling and the SINDA input format, or you have already viewed the NESC Academy lesson entitled “Building Your First SINDA Model.” Concepts and syntax discussed in the aforementioned lesson will not be discussed and viewers are assumed to be familiar with this material.
Lumberjack Tradeoff Model: The Degree of Imperfect Automation
Presenter Dr. Chris Wickens
Published October 2021
Recorded September 2021
Duration 59:00
Tags None
Abstract: A taxonomy of automation support for human performance is presented that describes support at each of four stages of human information processing at different levels of automation authority. These two dimensions (stages and levels) combining to define the degree of automation. The effect of degree of automation is modeled to show that, mediated by loss of situation awareness, the higher degree of automation, the better performance of the human-AI team when all goes well, but the more problematic is the human response when automation fails. Hence the Lumberjack model: the higher the tree, the harder it falls. Data from a meta-analysis, and from an air traffic control and a NASA robotic arm simulation are presented to support the model, and to show how automation transparency can mitigate the fall of the higher tree.
Integrated Photonics and Nanophotonic Devices Using Transparent Conductive Oxides
Presenter Alan Wang
Published September 2021
Recorded August 2021
Duration 47:07
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: Transparent conductive oxide (TCO) materials have attracted tremendous research interests for integrated photonics and nanophotonic devices in recent years due to the extraordinary perturbation to the refractive indices achieved either through oxygen vacancy doping or electrical gating. In addition, high quality TCO materials can be deposited using DC- or RF-sputtering on various substrates. Therefore, TCO materials promise unprecedented potentials for heterogeneous integration with silicon photonic integrated circuits (PICs) and nanophotonic platforms. In this talk, I will review recent research progress in my group for the development of TCO-gated silicon photonic devices to achieve ultra-high energy efficiency, high speed photonic devices, including photonic crystal nanocavity modulators and microring resonators with ultra-large E-O tuning efficiency. We also achieved 5Gbit/s E-O modulation speed and will also discuss the strategy to further improve the energy efficiency to atto-joule/bit and implement large-scale integration for data centers. TCO based metasurface devices will also be discussed with envisioned applications in optical filtering and beam control.
Evolution of Mars Rover Surface Navigation Autonomy
Presenter Mark Maimone
Published September 2021
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:00:55
Tags None
Abstract: NASA has launched four generations of Mars Rovers, each more capable than the last of driving autonomously on Mars. Autonomous behaviors like Hazard Detection and Avoidance, Visual Odometry, and Visual Terrain Tracking all have been used to help rovers drive more safely, more precisely, and into unknown areas never before seen by humans. This talk will discuss the evolution and benefits of vision-based Surface Navigational Autonomy across all four rover missions: what technologies were available, which were selected and at what mission phase, how they were used on Mars, and what mission benefits have resulted from their use. We'll review lessons learned from developing multiple generations of rovers, some of the new mobility capabilities of Perseverance, and the trials and tribulations of mission operations: rovers getting stuck, discovering unexpected terrains, and the implications for mission planning of letting a rover choose its own way.
Flight Deck Perspectives on the Complexity of Navigating in the Airport Terminal Area
Presenter Dr. Divya Chandra
Published September 2021
Recorded September 2021
Duration 56:34
Tags None
Abstract: In this talk, findings will be reviewed from a body of research we did to examine flight deck perspectives on the complexity of navigating in the airport terminal area, with an emphasis on operations that rely upon performance-based navigation (PBN). Arrival, departure, and approach paths designed to use PBN offer safety enhancements along with new levels of flexibility to negotiate terrain, airspace, and environmental considerations. The initial goal of this research was to study the design, depiction, usability, and fly-ability of these paths and their associated aeronautical charts. Over time, the focus shifted towards how well these paths work in actual operations because there are several different sources of complexity that impact pilot tasks as they fly these routes. This research was funded by the FAA NextGen Human Factors Division (ANG-C1).
Accelerating the Innovation Cycle of Nanophotonic Systems Design
Presenter Dr. Jonathan Fan
Published August 2021
Recorded August 2021
Duration 55:14
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: The general process for nanophotonics systems innovation involves identifying/generating a new concept, proposing a device design that can capture the concept, and validating the device design with an electromagnetic simulator. The latter two steps are typically performed iteratively by a researcher with specialized domain knowledge until a satisfactory device is identified, thereby requiring significant expenditure in time and computational cost. We will discuss computational algorithms based on deep neural networks that can accelerate the design and simulation of nanophotonic devices. We will discuss the use of generative networks to perform population-based optimization and elucidate how the neural network architecture can be tailored to effectively search for the global optimum in a non-convex design landscape. We will also discuss how physics-informed deep networks can be trained with a combination of data and physical constraints to serve as accurate surrogate electromagnetic solvers. We anticipate that the ability for deep learning models to accelerate and even automate the simulation and design of photonic systems will push the innovation cycle of photonics research in academia and industry.
A Digital Classification System to Assess Project Failures
Presenter Robert Moreland
Published August 2021
Recorded July 2021
Duration 01:01:08
Tags None
Abstract: Failure classification schemes are often used to categorize events that cause failures in projects. Despite the frequent publication of studies on project failure and success classification, there has been no analysis of failure classification schemes. Specifically, an open question concerns the similarities and differences of failure classification schemes between and within disciplines. Answering this question will provide insight into the applicability of a scheme across a range of disciplines and the challenges that may exist when multiple disciplines are collaborating on a project. Understanding the contents and nature of failure classification schemes is critical to improving theoretical study and practical implementation of schemes on projects. The research presented in this presentation identifies 400 failure classification schemes through a systematic review, extracts over 4000 perceived causes of failure from the schemes as meta-data, and analyzes the schemes with a focus on disciplinary differences in the perceived causes of failure. Meta-analysis of the perceived causes of failure in the 400 failure classification schemes identifies that the content of failure classification schemes are diverse, both within and across disciplines. Significant differences are shown between schemes used in different disciplines. Within disciplines, the schemes show patterns in the perceived causes of failure that appear most frequently and there are some common perceived causes of failure among many disciplines. The findings of the research conclude that caution must be taken if applying a scheme across multiple disciplines.
SPICE Thermal Vector Input for Numerical Heating Calculations
Open Circuit Resonant (SansEC) Sensor Technology Applications
Presenter George Szatkowski
Published July 2021
Recorded June 2021
Duration 43:03
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: Mr. Szatkowski will present his research pertaining to the design and measurement of open circuit electromagnetic resonant sensors (SansEC) for composite aircraft applications. The talk will also touch on other application areas where SansEC sensor technology could play a role in meeting future NASA measurement requirements and commercialization opportunities.
The Power and Pitfalls of Language in Accident Investigation
Presenter Crista Vesel , MSc
Published July 2021
Recorded June 2021
Duration 54:53
Tags None
Abstract: Communication plays a powerful role in creating safety in all work environments. Effective language can lead to individual and organizational learning during pre-mission briefings, real-time activities, and post-mission analysis. However, the meaning of language is not constant - it changes based on the experience of the person, the context of the event, and the social construction of the communicators. The language we use in accident investigations can impact how we make sense of events and whether we learn from them. Many factors can influence the review team during the collection of information and the writing of the report, such as our need for certainty in our lives, our inclination to assign agency, and our inherent biases. Accident reports often contain language that influences readers to make judgments that lead to simplistic blame, scapegoating, or even moral condemnation. Indeed, 'facts' are nothing without context, yet investigation language often closes the door to this rich world of information through its agentive descriptions, causal attributions, and use of taxonomies that place actions and decisions into pre-determined 'boxes'. This presentation will help you become sensitive to the power and pitfalls of language in areas of your life that go far beyond accident investigation!
Pitfalls of Autonomy
Presenter Mark Balas
Published June 2021
Recorded May 2021
Duration 01:04:04
Tags None
Instructions: - Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur. - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: Autonomy for Engineering Systems has become a highly controversial topic within the very parts of engineering systems theory and design where it was first gestated. In this talk I want examine the “myths of autonomy” and look carefully at some of the pitfall issues surrounding autonomy. Achieving full autonomy in cyber-systems is an extremely complex and difficult enterprise, and very unlikely to be acceptable for reasons that are related to human endeavor as well as safety. Humans must continue to interact with computer-controlled systems. The only viable system autonomy systems will be one that support collaboration on a careful foundation of research on human–cyber system interaction. In this presentation, insight into how this last might be developed will be discussed.
Challenges Measuring Atmospheric Composition of Giant Planets
Presenter Dr. Kunio Sayanagi
Published June 2021
Recorded May 2021
Duration 55:59
Tags None
This presentation will focus on the Small Next-generation Atmospheric Probe (SNAP) design developed in partnership by Hampton University and NASA Langley Research Center to enable delivery of multiple probes. Using SNAP as a reference design, key instrument trades and the state of the art in the atmospheric composition instruments will also be discussed.
Human Factors in Learning from Adverse Events: The Importance of Understanding Situation and Context
Presenter Professor Ron McLeod
Published June 2021
Recorded May 2021
Duration 55:42
Tags None
Instructions: - Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur. - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: The UK’s Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors (CIEHF) recently published a White Paper on ‘Learning from Adverse Events’. The paper sets out 9 Principles representing good practice in investigating and learning about the Human Factors contribution to events. Central to those principles are the importance of understanding both the situation and the context in which people made decisions and acted. After briefly summarising the nine principles, the talk will explore in some depth the difference between what is meant by “situation” and “context” in learning from events. Using examples of major incidents for illustration, the talk will demonstrate how psychological insight can help achieve deep learning about the context of human behaviour and performance
Moving Gracefully from Compliance to Learning, the Beginning of Forest Service's Learning Journey
Presenter Dr. Ivan Pupulidy
Published May 2021
Recorded April 2021
Duration 59:04
Tags None
Abstract: The US Forest Service faced a crisis of trust that was undermining communications and information flow. The result was an abysmal accident rate. This talk will explore field initiatives and leadership actions that began to change the organization's approach to learning. Three key pillars will be introduced: The leadership safety journey, field initiatives to change the way the organization responded to accidents and incidents, and some of the research that underpinned the changes that took place.
Getting Stuff Done
Presenter Stan Graves
Published April 2021
Recorded April 2021
Duration 02:19:21
Tags None
Abstract: Aerospace systems and product development processes continue to get ever more complex, requiring experts and specialists to get the work done. This complexity results in longer development times, higher costs, wasted effort and unhappy workers. What makes workers happy? Easy. Getting stuff done! The author will present methods on how to get more work done with fewer people, and less time. These methods include Rapid Learning Cycles, visual work boards, and Scrum principals and processes.
Spacecraft Design for Manual Control
Presenter Dr. John Osborn-Hoff
Published April 2021
Recorded March 2021
Duration 01:00:57
Tags None
Abstract: The use of the Cooper-Harper rating scale to evaluate spacecraft handling qualities has been standard practice for many years. NASA procedural requirements for human-rating of spacecraft specify manual control capabilities and satisfactory ratings of handling qualities using the Cooper-Harper scale. However, unlike aircraft, little formal guidance exists to aid the spacecraft designer in achieving these satisfactory ratings once the design is sufficiently mature to allow formal handling evaluations. By that time it is often too late in the design process to make significant changes without incurring excessive cost and schedule impacts. Most research into spacecraft handling qualities has tended to focus on evaluation of specific point designs rather than the development of general purpose design guidelines. This presentation gives an overview of manual control generally and a newly developed framework for development of specific design requirements to account for satisfactory handling qualities early in the spacecraft design process.
NASA Mishap Investigations & Resources
Presenter Kristie French
Published March 2021
Recorded February 2021
Duration 01:53:36
Tags None
Abstract: NASA does everything possible to reach success. But we must also prepare for failure in an effort to limit the impact of our bad days. To continue our mission, we must plan the moves ahead after loss. Kristie French, NASA Mishap Investigator will present the preparations, analysis and resources of the NASA mishap investigation process to ensure we understand and learn from our history.
CAL: NASA’s Cold Atom Lab Operating Onboard the ISS
Presenter Dr. Jason Williams
Published March 2021
Recorded February 2021
Duration 43:58
Tags None
Instructions: - Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur. - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: The Cold Atom Lab (CAL) launched to the International Space Station in May 2018, and has been operating since then as the world’s first multi-user facility for the study of ultra-cold atoms in space. The unique microgravity environment of the ISS allows researchers to achieve exceptionally low temperature gases, to study and utilize their quantum properties in an environment free from the perturbing force of gravity, and to observe and interact with these gases in the essentially limitless free-fall of orbit. A recent upgrade to CAL has also enabled the study of atom interferometry (AI) in space. Precision spaceborne AIs are expected to become an enabling quantum technology for a variety of fundamental and applied physics research areas which range from novel tests of the validity of the weak equivalence principle, measurements of the fine structure and gravitational constants, and detection of gravity waves and dark matter/dark energy, to next-generation accelerometers and rotation sensors for advanced PNT capabilities. We will discuss our efforts at JPL to provide pioneering, microgravity enabled quantum gas research capabilities with CAL, to demonstrate AI for the first time in space, and to mature this technology for future mission opportunities. The impact from this work, and potential for follow-on studies, will also be reviewed in the context of future space-based fundamental physics missions. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
JWST OTIS Cryogenic Vacuum Test, Part 4: Lessons Learned
Presenter Kan Yang
Published March 2021
Recorded August 2020
Duration 51:14
Tags None
Welcome to the fourth lecture of the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element and Integrated Science Instrument Model Cryogenic Vacuum Test lecture series. In this lecture, we will talk about the lessons learned from the planning and execution of the OTIS CV test.
JWST OTIS Cryogenic Vacuum Test, Part 3: Preparation for Off-Nominal Events
Presenter Kan Yang
Published March 2021
Recorded August 2020
Duration 52:49
Tags None
Welcome to the third lecture of the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element and Integrated Science Instrument Model Cryogenic Vacuum Test lecture series. In this lecture, we will talk about preparation for off-nominal events. Before we begin, I’d like to acknowledge three co-contributors that were instrumental in the development of the content for this section: Stuart Glazer, who was the thermal lead for the OTIS CV test; Lee Feinberg, who is the Optical Telescope Element manager for the James Webb Space Telescope and played an integral role in the overall success of the OTIS test campaign; and Brian Comber, who was the lead thermal analyst for the ISIM CV tests, as well as the sole developer of the Fusion test monitoring software and the uncontrolled helium shroud warmup analysis methodology that will be discussed in this section
Earth-Based Analogs & Modeling for Exercise Biomechanics in Space
Presenter Kaitlin Lostroscio
Published February 2021
Recorded November 2018
Duration 36:33
Tags None
Recorded December 12, 2018 The biomechanics of exercise in space is difficult to study and there are unknowns surrounding exercise performance on future space exploration countermeasures systems. These issues are beginning to be addressed through enhanced modeling techniques fueled initially by human-in-the-loop data collections in ground-based environments. The presentation will focus on an effort completed at the University of South Florida to apply the Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN) system to address a human spaceflight need. The research explored the interaction between a human and a moving platform while exercise was completed. This enabled study of the effects a vibration isolation system may have on exercise form and loading in these future exploration exercise suites. The combination of motion and force data collected in various environments, paired with computational models, allows our understanding of the system to grow. These methods provide design requirements and allow device designs to be supported by analysis.
Creating a World Class Safety Culture, Part II: Lessons Learned from Industrial Accidents
Presenter Stan Graves
Published February 2021
Recorded January 2021
Duration 02:03:15
Tags None
We will explore causes of industrial accidents, and provide several proactive best practices that will help prevent accidents.
Creating a World Class Safety Culture, Part I: Lessons Learned from Launch Vehicle Failures
Presenter Stan Graves
Published February 2021
Recorded January 2021
Duration 01:58:02
Tags None
Abstract: Stan Graves will provide his personal retrospection on the Space Shuttle Challenger and Columbia disasters, the Elements of Good Flight Rationale as a tool to help prevent future launch vehicle failure, and systemic causes of 5 unmanned launch vehicle failures in the late 1990s.
Electric Propulsion Microthrusters for Spacecraft Precision Pointing and Attitude Control
Presenter Dr. John Ziemer
Published February 2021
Recorded November 2020
Duration 01:05:56
Tags None
Abstract: This talk will focus on the different applications for precision microthrusters on spacecraft position and attitude control, including the flight experience of ST7 and some recent results of performance studies looking large-scale observatories. Precision microthrusters have been operated successfully in flight, providing drag-free and precision control for spacecraft that can be used for future applications such as gravity wave and exoplanet observatories. The Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS) technology demonstration payload included eight Busek Colloid Micro-Newton Thrusters (CMNTs) as part of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder mission that launched in December of 2015, which also included European cold gas microthrusters. The CMNTs provided full attitude and precision drag-free control of the spacecraft with 10 nm/√Hz stability along the most sensitive axis during commissioning, nominal, and extended mission phases through April of 2017. Performance requirements (≤0.1 µN/√Hz) were met and models were validated based on on-orbit measurements of test mass motion and actuation during the 60-day nominal and 30-day extended missions. In 2018, the European Space Agency (ESA) selected LISA to be the agency’s next “large-class” mission, currently in Phase A, with a launch scheduled for 2034 and a 12.5-year duration. NASA is considering a significant contribution of hardware to the ESA-led mission, potentially including colloid microthrusters. In preparation, NASA is developing five technologies to TRL 5 and 6, including the colloid microthrusters, to be ready for infusion into LISA. The Habitable Exoplanet (HabEx) observatory mission concept also might require precision microthrusters for attitude control, replacing reaction wheels with worse pointing performance. In this case, using colloid microthrusters have been shown to meet the tight pointing requirements necessary to image Earth-like exoplanets around nearby stars. Future Earth-orbiting gravity-measurement missions, similar to GRACE, are also considering atmospheric drag-free operation to improve resolution.
Miserable Risk Estimation: "Managing" Low-Probability, High-Consequence Risks"
Presenter Dr. Mary Kaiser
Published January 2021
Recorded October 2020
Duration 01:02:04
Tags None
Abstract: As with all bold endeavors, NASA missions must identify and manage their risks. While estimating the consequences of these risks is typically straightforward, it can be challenging to estimate their likelihood. This is especially true for low-probability risks, due both to the lack of operational data and the cognitive biases humans bring to risk estimation. In this talk, I will present both a tongue-in-cheek and “Management Science” approach to estimating low-probability, high-consequence risks. I then summon my Human Factors colleagues to provide NASA mission managers with the gentle guidance needed to avoid common errors in risk assessment.
Shiftwork & Managing Fatigue
Presenter Kevin Gregory
Published January 2021
Recorded August 2020
Duration 01:03:08
Tags None
Abstract: There are physiological limits to human performance, influenced by the internal programming of the sleep homeostat and circadian rhythms. Shiftwork and working at irregular times of day present significant physiological challenges for individuals. This presentation will provide information about the physiology underlying fatigue, and provide some practical strategies for personal fatigue management, for better sleep and in managing alertness on the job.
Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) - Chapter 1: Introduction
Presenter Dr. Othmane Benafan
Published January 2021
Recorded May 2020
Duration 01:05:42
Tags None
Sixty years after the discovery of shape memory alloys (SMAs), many actuation and structural applications using these materials have been conceived and developed. SMAs are a unique class of multifunctional materials that have the ability to recover large deformations and generate high stresses in response to thermal, mechanical and/or electromagnetic stimuli. These abilities have made them a viable option for actuation/structural systems in aerospace applications, amongst others. However, designing with SMAs is a paradigm shift from the conventional way we look at metals and mechanisms. In this course, you will learn how the unique properties of SMAs can be applied to designing mechanisms and the associated benefits. Basic primer will be provided on what they are and why they work with examples of the most successful applications that have been imagined. Common design tool and properties-database will be discussed.
Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) - Chapter 2: SMAs to Mechanisms
Presenter Dr. Othmane Benafan
Published January 2021
Recorded May 2020
Duration 01:19:27
Tags None
Sixty years after the discovery of shape memory alloys (SMAs), many actuation and structural applications using these materials have been conceived and developed. SMAs are a unique class of multifunctional materials that have the ability to recover large deformations and generate high stresses in response to thermal, mechanical and/or electromagnetic stimuli. These abilities have made them a viable option for actuation/structural systems in aerospace applications, amongst others. However, designing with SMAs is a paradigm shift from the conventional way we look at metals and mechanisms. In this course, you will learn how the unique properties of SMAs can be applied to designing mechanisms and the associated benefits. Basic primer will be provided on what they are and why they work with examples of the most successful applications that have been imagined. Common design tool and properties-database will be discussed.
Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) - Chapter 3: Mechanism Design
Presenter Dr. Othmane Benafan
Published January 2021
Recorded May 2020
Duration 46:23
Tags None
Sixty years after the discovery of shape memory alloys (SMAs), many actuation and structural applications using these materials have been conceived and developed. SMAs are a unique class of multifunctional materials that have the ability to recover large deformations and generate high stresses in response to thermal, mechanical and/or electromagnetic stimuli. These abilities have made them a viable option for actuation/structural systems in aerospace applications, amongst others. However, designing with SMAs is a paradigm shift from the conventional way we look at metals and mechanisms. In this course, you will learn how the unique properties of SMAs can be applied to designing mechanisms and the associated benefits. Basic primer will be provided on what they are and why they work with examples of the most successful applications that have been imagined. Common design tool and properties-database will be discussed.
Introduction to Orbital Mechanics and Spacecraft Attitudes for Thermal Engineers, 05: Spacecraft Attitudes
Introduction to Orbital Mechanics and Spacecraft Attitudes for Thermal Engineers, 04: Advanced Orbit Concepts
Introduction to Orbital Mechanics and Spacecraft Attitudes for Thermal Engineers, 03: Perturbed Orbits
Introduction to Orbital Mechanics and Spacecraft Attitudes for Thermal Engineers, 02: The Two Body Problem
Introduction to Orbital Mechanics and Spacecraft Attitudes for Thermal Engineers, 01: Introduction
Spaceborne Laser Transmitter Development for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Mission
Presenter Anthony Yu
Published January 2021
Recorded May 2020
Duration 56:04
Tags None
The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a partnership between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA to build a Gravitational Wave (GW) observatory. The observatory, which consists of a three-spacecraft constellation with a nominal separation of 2.5 million km between each spacecraft, provides a tool for scientists to directly detect gravitational waves generated from various astronomical phenomena in a waveband that is not accessible from Earth. NASA is developing laser transmitters as one of the potential US contributions to LISA. The NASA laser design leverages lessons learned from previous flight missions, and includes the latest technologies in photonics packaging and reliability engineering to ensure a laser lifetime of 16 years covering integration and test through a possible extended mission phase. The laser system is one of the most important components of the LISA measurement system, since it will provide the light used to make the sensitive interferometric distance measurement between the spacecraft. We at the NASA GSFC have been developing a highly stable and robust master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser system for LISA since 2018. The MOPA architecture entails two major subsystems – (i) the master oscillator (MO), a lower power laser that meets majority of the laser requirements except power; and (ii) the power amplifier (PA), which boosts the low output power of the MO to the required power without imparting additional noise. Our laser design philosophy is driven by LISA’s unique requirements arising from its role in the extremely long-baseline interferometric measurement system. It must have exquisite stability in both wavelength (which requires active stabilization using a high finesse optical cavity) and intensity (which requires active stabilization for long-term drifts and quantum-limited performance over short time scales). In addition the laser must be robust enough to survive the 16 years of operation from early ground testing through the extended mission phase. The unique LISA requirements make evaluation of the laser performance challenging. To enable testing of these lasers, we built a unique laser characterization infrastructure that does not exist in industry, other Government labs, or academia. These in situ test capabilities provide important advantages including: time savings, cost savings, and improved ability to meet compliance requirements. In this talk we will discuss the NASA GSFC laser development effort for LISA with emphasis on: (1) the design and packaging of the MOPA laser, (2) reliability and risk mitigation plan to show compliance with the 16-year LISA lifetime requirement, and (3) test facilities for the demonstration of laser performance. We are targeting a delivery of a form, fit, and functional laser to ESA in 2020 and a fully space-qualified TRL6 MOPA laser by mid-2021.
ARCSTONE: Calibration of Lunar Spectral Reflectance from Space
Presenter Dr. Constantine Lukashin
Published January 2021
Recorded September 2020
Duration 42:34
Tags None
Detecting and improving the scientific understanding of global trends in complex Earth systems, such as climate, increasingly depends on assimilating datasets from multiple instruments and platforms over decadal timescales. Calibration accuracy, stability, and inter-consistency among different instruments are key to developing reliable composite data records from sensors in low Earth and geostationary orbits, but achieving sufficiently low uncertainties for these performance metrics poses a significant challenge. Space-borne instruments commonly carry on-board references for calibration at various wavelengths, but these increase mass and mission complexity, and are subject to degradation in the space environment. The Moon can be considered a natural solar diffuser which can be observed as a calibration target by most spaceborne Earth-observing instruments. Since the lunar surface reflectance is effectively time-invariant, establishing the Moon as a high-accuracy calibration reference enables broad inter-calibration opportunities even between temporally non-overlapping instruments and provides an exo-atmospheric absolute radiometric standard. The ARCSTONE mission goal is to establish the Moon as a reliable reference for high-accuracy on-orbit calibration in the visible and near-infrared spectral region. The ARCSTONE instrument is a compact spectrometer, which will be packaged on a CubeSat intended for low Earth orbit. It will measure the lunar spectral reflectance with accuracy 0.5% (k=1), sufficient to establish an SI-traceable absolute lunar calibration standard when referenced to the spectral solar irradiance across the 350 to 2300 nm spectral range. This lunar reference will help to enable high-accuracy absolute calibration and inter-calibration of past, current, and future Earth-observing sensors, meteorological imagers, and long-term climate monitoring satellite systems. The ARCSTONE team will present the development status of a full-spectral-range (FSR) instrument, the intended approach to calibration and characterization, and the planned path toward mission implementation.
Systems Engineering & Model Based Systems Engineering Stakeholder State of the Discipline
Presenter Jessica Knizhnik
Published November 2020
Recorded June 2020
Duration 01:02:54
Tags None
Abstract: Join us as we discuss the results of a “comprehensive” study, conducted by the Systems Engineering TDT, in a special webinar. Find out where the SE discipline, in the aerospace industry, has opportunity for improvement and how cultural issues remain the number one challenge to MBSE implementation. We’ll also be discussing opportunities where NASA and its stakeholders can move forward together in SE innovation. Anyone interested in SE and its future, from systems engineers, MBSE practitioners, managers, and NASA partners are invited to attend. A full detailed report of study results that goes beyond the overview’s executive conclusions is also available. Both can be found at https://www.nasa.gov/nesc/articles/se-mbse-state-of-the-discipline Please join us in this informative discussion.
Using MBSE on a Working Project
Presenter Kerry McGuire
Published November 2020
Recorded August 2020
Duration 01:00:47
Tags None
Abstract: Our future missions are changing the way in which we will practice medicine. To ensure these challenges are addressed the Human Research Program (HRP) is dedicated to discovering the best methods and technologies to support safe, productive human space travel. Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element, one of the five HRP elements, focuses on advancing medical system design and risk-informed decision making for exploration beyond low Earth orbit, to promote human health and performance in space. They are conducting research on how to best design and build a medical system, a sub-system to the Crew Health and Performance (CHP) system, for exploration missions. Their research involves the practical application of System Engineering (SE) best practices to generate products typically associated with Phase A activities as defined in NPR 7123.1B, NASA Systems Engineering Processes and Requirements. Historically, CHP systems tend to be designed and integrated into an already designed vehicle, which severely constrains the functionality of CHP system. ExMC seeks to better integrate the medical system within the CHP system into overall mission and vehicle design. This talk will discuss the what, why and how the ExMC SE team is creating a foundation for a Level of Care IV and V medical systems using a systems engineering approach with Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) tools.
MBSE to MIAMI to Implementation, an Overview
Presenter Jessica Knizhnik
Published November 2020
Recorded October 2020
Duration 01:06:03
Tags None
Abstract: How can NASA successfully deploy Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) to provide value added to its workforce? What must be done now and what should NASA consider for the future? This webcast will propose answers to these questions. The agency’s MBSE Infusion And Modernization Initiative (MIAMI), including its pathfinders, dozen active project partnerships, and initial Community of Practice, ran for five years. During this webcast MIAMI Leadership will use its lessons learned and successes to propose a workforce centered approach for advancing the agency’s system modeling capability.
An Innovative Jump Start for MBSE Tooling, NTL Results
Presenter Samantha Infeld
Published November 2020
Recorded August 2020
Duration 53:40
Tags None
Abstract: NASA’s Center of excellence for Collaborative Innovation (CoECI) uses open innovation, or “crowdsourcing”, to access the global public to find ideas, concepts, designs, or solutions that meet a previously unmet need possibly resulting in significant advances in performance. CoECI runs the NASA Tournament Lab (NTL); NTL is the public brand which conducts the challenges. A NTL challenge was sponsored by NASA Engineering and Safety Center Systems Engineering Technical Fellow as part of a program for NASA’s adoption of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE). It was a trial to see if there would be as much participation or quality submissions with this more specialized topic and skill. The challenge sought space architecture representations and decompositions to create a library of modeled parts in a system modeling language (SysML). Solutions came from individuals and teams, students and professional consultants from the United States and Europe. Through this challenge, we learned a few lessons about how to engage with the public and what characteristics of a problem result in good crowdsourcing results. In this webcast, we’ll explore the proposed direct use of entries, with examples from their models, as well as discuss the benefits of running the NTL challenge.
Lidar for NASA Applications
Presenter Dr. Tso Yee Fan
Published October 2020
Recorded July 2020
Duration 54:20
Tags None
Lidar (light detection and ranging) is a sensing modality that has applications across NASA, such as global terrain mapping, global wind sounding, trace gas mapping, and precision landing. These lidar systems rely on laser transmitters to generate light, and photodetectors to receive the return signal. An example of a recent success, noted in the popular press, is ICESAT-2, which is an instrument used to map Earth’s ice sheets in the polar regions by transmitting short pulses, on the order of a few ns, and measuring the range to the surface by the round-trip time-of-flight of the return photons. The strengths of lidars compared with other sensing modalities are generally high vertical resolution, day and night measurements (as compared with passive optical remote sensing), precision, and specificity (for sensing molecular species). However, lidar systems, particularly for the Earth science applications, have been viewed as risky, immature, and limited – this view primarily driven by the state of laser technology for space missions. This webinar will present an overview of lidars and their NASA applications and then focus on a specific example, global, high-resolution, water-vapor concentration measurements, which has been of interest for over three decades. The main stumbling block for space-based water vapor lidar has been the laser transmitter technology; new developments are bringing hope that this stumbling block can be removed.
How to Get Started Using MBSE on a Project: The Basics of What, How and Who
Presenter Trevor Grondin
Published August 2020
Recorded June 2020
Duration 57:49
Tags None
Model-based Systems Engineering is seeing a lot of attention lately. Many projects at NASA have started using MBSE on some portion of their SE work. The long list of proposed benefits for MBSE is impressive, but can MBSE be used throughout a project life-cycle? Should MBSE be an "all-or-nothing" decision when doing project planning? Answering these questions can be intimidating for individuals who are new to MBSE, or those that have only seen successes in small areas of the SE function, but are not able to visualize how to use MBSE across a whole project. This talk helps to define the process of starting Systems Engineering on any project, and how MBSE ties in to it. Through the lens of "modeling with a purpose", Trevor Grondin walks through how to examine the Systems Engineering role for a given project, and how to assess using MBSE to add value to the work being done. From sizing the scope of the work, assessing uses of MBSE, and identifying project constraints, to developing a modeling plan that support the Systems Engineering approach, this talk will help arm modelers and LSEs alike with the framework they need to start using MBSE on a project.
Recurring Causes of Human Spaceflight Mishaps during Flight Tests and Early Operations
Presenter Dr. Tim Barth
Published August 2020
Recorded May 2020
Duration 01:48:51
Tags None
**Restricted to NASA CS/Contractor** Dr. Tim Barth, NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) systems engineer, and Steve Lilley, NASA Safety Center senior safety engineer, will present the findings and recommendations from a technical study recently published by the NESC. An analysis of recurring causes underlying human spaceflight mishaps that occurred during flight tests and early operations was performed. Eight mishaps from the Apollo, Soyuz, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and Constellation Programs (i.e., the Ares-1X test flight) and early commercial suborbital operations were included in the study. Detailed event analyses were performed for the historical mishaps and aggregate data analyses conducted to identify recurring issues. The nine most frequent issues were inadequate technical controls or risk management practices, incomplete procedures, system design and development issues, inadequate inspection or secondary verification requirements, failures of organizations to learn from previous incidents, inadequate schedule controls, inadequate task analyses or design processes, flaws in the design of organizations, and issues with organizational safety cultures. The study’s goal was to use selected flight test/early operations mishap investigations to identify recurring factor patterns and provide results to current human spaceflight programs to inform and stimulate their mishap risk management efforts. Study results can provide current human spaceflight programs with data and examples to seed discussions and questions such as: • What else can be done within my area of responsibility to ensure crew safety? • What are we doing now that needs to be improved? • What could be stopped and replaced with a better approach? • What is working in other subsystems than can be extended to my subsystem?
Robust Stability: From Disk Margins to Neural Network Analysis
Presenter Dr. Peter Seiler
Published August 2020
Recorded June 2020
Duration 01:00:28
Tags None
Recorded June 24, 2020 This talk will provide a tutorial introduction to disk margins. These are robust stability measures that account for simultaneous gain and phase perturbations in a feedback system. This provides a generalization of classical (gain-only and phase-only) stability margins. The talk will motivate the use of disk margins and provide several examples including applications to multiple-input, multiple-output control systems. The talk will conclude with some recent extensions of this basic robustness analysis framework. It will be shown that typical robust control methods can be used to assess stability and robustness of feedback loops that use neural networks.
Automation Myths and the Virtues of Human-Machine Teaming
Presenter Dr. Robert Hoffman
Published July 2020
Recorded August 2018
Duration 41:15
Tags None
A number of widely-held beliefs underlie much of the popular discussion about automation, and also many of the government funding programs aimed at developing advanced technology. These include myths about autonomy, function allocation, compensation for human limitations, and automation as a substitution for people. These myths are not only misleading, but can be costly because they engender a host of serious misconceptions for policy makers thinking and for engineers. In this presentation we will review these myths and then counter them with the alternative view of human-machine teaming. This focuses design on teamwork, rather than taskwork. Specifically it focuses on interdependent activity, rather than independent work. It focuses on lifetime resilience rather than short-term procurement costs. Successful human-machine teamwork requires more than an engineering solution to the machine capabilities. It also requires a holistic view that takes into account the requirements of the entire human-machine work system in its application context.
Development of High Temperature Smart Sensor Systems
Presenter Dr. Gary W. Hunter
Published July 2020
Recorded October 2018
Duration 57:05
Tags None
Dr. Gary W. Hunter, NASA Glenn Research Center will present the Sensors and Instrumentation Webcast, “Development of High Temperature Smart Sensor Systems,” on Tuesday, October 16 at 2 pm Eastern. Sensors and sensor systems are central to providing improved system operations and situational awareness for a range of aerospace applications. A Smart Sensor System as described here implies at a minimum the use of sensors combined with electronic processing capabilities. A more expansive view of a Smart Sensor System is a complete self-contained sensor system that includes the capabilities for data logging and processing, self-contained power, and an ability to transmit or display informative data to an outside user. One aerospace challenge for the Smart Sensor System approach is application in extreme environments where both the core sensor technology and supporting hardware approach their operational limits. This presentation describes efforts to develop Smart Sensor Systems to enable Intelligent Systems, with an emphasis on high temperature sensors and electronics with the potential for wireless capabilities. Recent work has notably expanded high temperature electronics capabilities and produced the world’s first microcircuits of moderate complexity that have the potential for sustained operation at 500˚C. These circuits are at a level to enable a wide range of on-board data processing, including signal amplification, local processing, and wireless transmission of data. An overview will be given of development of sensors and electronics for a Venus lander, the Long-Lived In-Situ Solar System Explorer, with targeted operational lifetime of at least 60 days on the Venus surface. In summary, it is suggested that small, smart sensor system technologies are an enabling first step towards more intelligent vehicle systems and expanded capabilities across a range of aerospace and planetary applications.
History of Thermal at Goddard
Presenter Ed Powers
Published July 2020
Recorded May 2020
Duration 01:03:46
Tags None
JWST OTIS Cryogenic Vacuum Test, Part 2: Thermal Analysis
Presenter Kan Yang
Published July 2020
Recorded May 2020
Duration 01:19:25
Tags None
In Part II, we will provide an overview of the OTIS CV test thermal model development. A description of some of the driving limits and constraints will be provided, as well as how these influenced our test planning and eventual execution. One significant aspect of our pre-test planning is the method by which we optimized the OTIS CV test cooldown and warmup profiles using the thermal model by incorporating a feedback loop for driving helium shroud temperature. We will spend some time introducing the logic for this feedback loop, which traded test time versus model safety to determine the most efficient way to cool and warm the payload. Finally, we will take a look at how our pre-test predictions compared with our actual performance in the OTIS CV test.
Aerogel-Based Thermal Insulation Systems for Cryogenic-vacuum Applications
Presenter James Fesmire
Published June 2020
Recorded June 2018
Duration 01:03:34
Tags None
Many different aerogel-based materials are now being used in thermal insulation systems for cryogenic applications. These materials include flexible composite blankets, bulk-fill particles, and polymer composites in both evacuated and non-evacuated environments. In ambient environments, aerogels provide superior thermal performance compared to conventional polymeric foam and cellular glass insulations while offering unique advantages in avoiding problems with weathering, moisture, and mechanical damage. Aerogels are also used in layered insulation systems providing combined structural-thermal capability for cryogenic applications in either vacuum-jacketed or externally-applied insulation designs. Test data (effective thermal conductivity) include a wide range of both commercial and experimental aerogel materials. Testing was performed using laboratory cryostats and standard methods including full range vacuum (from ambient pressure to high vacuum) and boundary temperatures 293 K and 78 K. Examples of aerogel-based insulation systems are given for both evacuated and non-evacuated applications. Technical resources for further data and study are also provided. Briefly addressed are the following topics on aerogel insulation systems: • Production & processing methods • Types of aerogels/composites • Properties & phenomena • Thermal testing • Thermal data • Applications & problem-solving
The Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment, Part 1
Presenter Dr. Mohammad Kassemi
Published June 2020
Recorded July 2018
Duration 01:20:44
Tags None
The Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments are a series of small scale tank pressurization and pressure control experiments aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that use a transparent volatile simulant fluid in a transparent sealed tank to delineate various fundamental fluid flow, heat and mass transport, and phase change phenomena that control storage tank pressurization and pressure control in microgravity. The hardware for ZBOT-1 flew to ISS on the OA-7 flight in April 2017. Operations began in September 2017 and were completed by December 2017, encompassing more than 100 tests. Hand-in-Hand with the experiment a state-of-the-art two-phase CFD model of the storage tank pressurization & pressure control is also developed and validated against the experimental results.
Human Factors Applications of Biomechanical Modeling
Presenter Dr. Beth Lewandowski
Published June 2020
Recorded June 2019
Duration 38:55
Tags None
Recorded June 18, 2019 Biomechanical data collection and modeling has applications to the field of human factors. Specifically, motion data can be used to determine the operational volume necessary for performing a task. The operational volume assessment can be performed in order to determine how much volume is needed to perform the task or if task performance can be contained and adequately performed within an allocated volume. Motion and external force data, along with computational modeling techniques, can be used to estimate the internal loading produced during performance of a task. Internal loading estimates can be used to determine if an adequate stimulus is generated for maintenance of musculoskeletal health and also for comparison to injury thresholds to determine injury risk during task performance.
Futuristic Habitat Concepts to Expand Human Capability in Space
Presenter Dr. Robert Howard
Published June 2020
Recorded May 2020
Duration 59:34
Tags None
Since the dawn of human space flight there have been visions for human space flight programs that send humans to destinations beyond Earth. NASA is currently committed to the lunar surface, Mars surface, and deep space transport. Unfortunately, instabilities in US space policy have caused NASA to change focus repeatedly between these architectures since the 1970s. Further, it can be shown that developing lunar, Martian, and transit habitats in series will require inordinately long periods of time, resulting in exorbitant program expenses. A mitigation to these challenges could be to develop a Common Habitat design for both transit and surface operations. A Common Habitat derived from the Space Launch System core stage’s liquid oxygen tank and manufactured on the same production line as the SLS can be designed to provide functionality required for both microgravity transit and surface operations. Part one of this webcast will describe design considerations and options in addressing open challenges and unknowns as they pertain to horizontal or vertical interior orientation, integration with lunar or Martian landers, docking and resupply logistics, and variations in crew size. Part two of this webcast introduces the idea of a transit spacecraft whose primary crew mission is found within the transit as opposed to the destination. This webcast introduces the concept of a Deep Space Science Vessel (DSSV), a large, multi-purpose, multi-disciplinary science spacecraft intended for human spaceflight operations in the inner solar system. This webcast will define the DSSV onboard crew functions and describe target performance levels for each function. It will then discuss the habitable volume of the spacecraft, providing high level workstation descriptions and preliminary layout options for portions of the spacecraft. Attached and typical visiting vehicles will be described, including their functions, heritage, and examples of mission-specific configurations. Mission concepts will be described for key missions possible within the vehicle’s operating range. Sample crew composition for the DSSV will be discussed. Finally, future work will be described, providing context for human development of the inner solar system.
STS/ISS On-Orbit Flight Control: A Historical Perspective or Some Funny Things Happened While Assembling the Space Station
Presenter Robert Hall
Published June 2020
Recorded February 2020
Duration 01:03:09
Tags None
This aired on February 26th, 2020 The assembly of the International Space Station was a very complex flight control and integration challenge. This presentation discusses some of those challenges, along with some things that happened along the way that weren't expected.
Practical Application of Human Factors in Flight Hardware Design
Presenter Sean Schimelpfening
Published March 2020
Recorded January 2020
Duration 51:19
Tags None
Abstract: The following presentation and corresponding hardware demonstration were developed as training for U.S. ISS Payload Developers (PDs), to instruct them how to design hardware to meet ISS Payload Human Factors requirements and guidelines, and to brief them about the services the ISS Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) offers to them. Applying Human Factors requirements and guidelines to flight hardware design is not as simple as one would think. This presentation and hands-on demonstration have proven valuable to get hardware developers to think about designing crew interfaces that are safe and easy to operate.
Demonstrating a Galactic Positioning System Using X-ray Emitting Millisecond Pulsars
Presenter Jason Mitchell
Published March 2020
Recorded October 2019
Duration 01:01:05
Tags None
Abstract: Accurate reference clocks are critical to navigation. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), principally the Global Positioning System (GPS), provide the precise space-based clocks that have revolutionized navigation and timekeeping terrestrially and within the Interoperable Space Service Volume (SSV), i.e., near Earth including above the GNSS constellations. Unfortunately, for spacecraft navigation beyond Earth into deep space, GNSS is not available. While GNSS constellations are unavailable to spacecraft in deep space, observing X-ray emissions from rapidly spinning neutron stars, called millisecond pulsars (MSPs), has been shown to fill that gap; a process often referred to as X-ray Navigation (XNAV). MSPs are distributed throughout our galaxy and many pulsate at intervals so regular that they rival terrestrial atomic clocks on long time scales, similar to those clocks contained in GNSS satellites. By carefully timing these pulsations, an XNAV equipped spacecraft can use these celestial lighthouses to autonomously determine its absolute position, with uniform accuracy, anywhere within our Solar System and even beyond. This is in contrast to conventional position determination using Earth-based tracking, in which a communication link back to Earth is required and accuracy degrades as the distance from Earth grows. In this webcast, results will be presented of the Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) demonstration, which successfully executed the first on-orbit use of XNAV to perform autonomous onboard and real-time space navigation. SEXTANT was a NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development (GCD) program funded technology enhancement to the Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission, which is currently operating on the International Space Station (ISS).
Oculometric Assessment of Mild Neural Impairment
Presenter Dr. Leland Stone
Published March 2020
Recorded January 2020
Duration 48:56
Tags None
Abstract: For over 100 years, neurologists have used eye movements to identify neural impairment, disease, or injury. Prior to the age of modern imaging, qualitative assessment of eye movements was a critical, routine component of diagnosis and remains today a routine law-enforcement tool for detecting impaired driving due to drugs or alcohol. We will describe the application of a simple 5-minute oculomotor tracking task coupled with a broad range of quantitative analyses of high-resolution oculomotor measurements for the sensitive detection of sub-clinical neural impairment and for the potential differentiation of various causes. Specifically, we will show that there are distinct patterns of impairment across our set of oculometric parameters observed with brain trauma, sleep and circadian disruption, and alcohol consumption. Such differences could form the basis of a self-administered medical monitoring or diagnostic support tool.
Actively Tunable Filter Components (ATFCs) Using Phase Change Materials (PCM) for Scientific Instrumentation
Presenter Dr. Hyun Jung Kim
Published January 2020
Recorded December 2019
Duration 53:16
Tags None
Abstract: The presentation addresses the challenge in improving the key scientific component metrics of Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) associated with active tuning filter components (ATFCs). The team at NASA LaRC, working with collaborators, developed an ATFC, an all-solid-state tunable filter, based on a Phase Change Material (PCM) which can operate across the visible and infrared spectrum. Optical filters are critical components in a plethora of NASA Earth and Space science missions. The challenge: The optical filter wheel, when combined with multiple Fabry-Perot filters are used for many NASA missions including SAGE-IV and SCIFLI (Scientifically Calibrated In-Flight Imagery). Conventional Fabry-Perot filters offer discrete, static passbands, thus requiring laser filter wheels to accommodate many individual filters. The filter wheel has moving parts, has slow response times and/or provides limited spectral resolution. Our solution: The ATFC is a single-component tunable filter which has the advantage of a robust and continuous tuning bandwidth, allowing for a single component to replace the multiple filters required by the filter wheel. Our major advances include: • A new design concept marrying two distinct physical phenomena: PCM and extraordinary optical transmission are independently well-known. However, by combining their specific benefits in a single novel design, unexplored capabilities have been demonstrated. • Continuously tunable, reversible, operation across the spectral band of interest: The utilization of optically switched, partially crystalline phases of PCM allows for a near continuum of states over the MWIR waveband. • Spectrally agnostic, robust design: A straightforward design modification permits operation from the visible to the MWIR spectral bands, with no major design modifications required; the design is spectrally agnostic. • High transmission efficiency and narrowband performance: Our devices have unrivalled optical performance characteristics. • Real-time thermal imaging using our filters: Using a conventional IR-camera, real-world applicability is shown through tunable multispectral thermal imaging. Future direction: The reduction in volume and weight of the ATFC will enable an instrument to fit within a SmallSat configuration, freeing up available space for other components and reducing the overall cost of the payload. Therefore, the ATFC would become a central component for future Earth science measurement instrumentation. Additionally, the ATFC is applicable to wider multi-and hyper-spectral imaging; from applications in chemical sensing, astronomy, radiometry, and biomedical diagnosis. In the presentation, customizable wavelength filters and their applications will be discussed as well as the future direction of the technology. The team: Mr. Scott Bartram, Mr. Stephen Borg, Dr. Matthew Julian, and Dr. Calum Williams comprise the team. The team acknowledges support from the NASA LaRC FY19 and FY20 CIF/IRAD Program.
Navigation Doppler Lidar: A Velocity and Altitude Sensor for Landing Vehicles
Presenter Dr. Farzin Amzajerdian
Published December 2019
Recorded June 2019
Duration 52:17
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar using the "Add to Calendar" link for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides will be available to download in the "Links." - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! A coherent Doppler lidar has been developed to address NASA’s need for a high-performance, compact, and cost-effective velocity and altitude sensor for use onboard its landing vehicles. Future robotic and manned missions to solar system bodies require precise ground-relative velocity vectors and altitude data to execute complex descent maneuvers and safe soft landing at the pre-designated site. This lidar sensor, referred to as Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL), can meet the required performance of landing missions while complying with most vehicle size, mass, and power constraints. Operating from several kilometers altitude, the NDL can provide velocity and range precision with about 2 cm/sec and 2 meters, respectively, dominated by the vehicle motion. The NDL transmits three laser beams at different pointing angles toward the ground and measures range and velocity along each beam using a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique. The three line-of-sight measurements are then combined in order to determine the three components of the vehicle velocity vector and its altitude relative to the ground. After a series of flight tests onboard helicopters and rocket-powered free-flyer vehicles, the NDL is now being ruggedized for future missions to various destinations in the solar system.
Exploring Human Performance Contributions to Safety in Commercial Aviation
Presenter Dr. Jon Holbrook
Published November 2019
Recorded February 2019
Duration 36:37
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar using the "Add to Calendar" link for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides are available to download in the "Links." - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: Data-driven decisions about safety management and design of safety-critical systems are limited by the available data, which influence, and are influenced by, how decision makers characterize problems and identify solutions. In the commercial aviation domain, data are systematically collected and analyzed on the failures and errors that result in infrequent incidents and accidents, but in the absence of data on behaviors that result in routine successful outcomes, safety management and system design decisions are based on a small sample of non-representative safety data. As a case in point, analysis of aviation accident data suggests that human error is implicated in up to 80% of accidents, which has been used to justify future visions for aviation in which the roles of human operators are greatly diminished or eliminated in the interest of creating a safer aviation system. However, failure to fully consider the human contributions to successful system performance in civil aviation represents a significant and largely unrecognized risk. Without understanding how humans contribute to safety, any estimate of predicted safety of autonomous machine capabilities is incomplete and inherently suspect.
JWST OTIS Cryogenic Vacuum Test, Part 1: Thermal Architecture
Presenter Kan Yang
Published October 2019
Recorded September 2019
Duration 30:59
Tags None
This series discusses the cryogenic vacuum testing of the James Webb Space Telescope’s Optical Telescope Element and Integrated Science Instrument Module, or OTIS. This test required multiple years of planning and was executed from July-October of 2017 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. There are four parts to this series: Part I will introduce the major components of James Webb and specifically the thermal architecture of the OTIS cryogenic vacuum or CV test. Part II will encompass the extensive thermal analysis performed to prepare for the test. Part III will talk about the preparations for off-nominal events: what analysis was done, and how steps were taken pre-test to anticipate unexpected circumstances and mitigate their impacts to hardware and test timeline. Part IV is a recap of the lessons learned from the thermal test conductor perspective for both the payload team and the ground support equipment or GSE team.
Virtual Reality for Worksite Analysis Methods
Presenter Tanya Andrews
Published October 2019
Recorded August 2019
Duration 32:03
Tags None
Open to the Public Recorded September 10, 2019 NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Human Factors Engineering (HFE) Team is implementing Virtual Reality (VR) into HFE analyses of various projects. MSFC HFE is responsible for the worksite analyses of the integration efforts of the Space Launch System (SLS) that will be performed at Kennedy Space center (KSC), as well as the HFE analyses of Deep Space Habitat (DSH) Concepts. There is a wide variety of tasks, and it is important to verify that the vehicle can be integrated at KSC early in the design process. If the ground support crew cannot complete the task, access the parts of the elements that require integration, or if other hardware may be damaged during such access, redesign efforts have to be implemented. MSFC HFE is responsible for this verification and has used methods such as drawing inspection, observation of tasks performed on test articles, and building physical mockups that are sometimes used with Motion Capture (MoCap). In addition, VR analyses are now being utilized for a faster analysis early in the process that can impact design before drawings are finalized and funds are allocated for physical mockups. This technology does not replace the need for physical mockups in most cases, but rather improves the design maturity of the physical mockup. All of these methods are used in tandem to perform HFE assessments at NASA MSFC.
Fast-Light Inertial Sensors
Presenter Dr. David D. Smith
Published October 2019
Recorded June 2019
Duration 54:32
Tags None
Abstract: Fundamental improvements in the precision of inertial sensors are critical for onboard autonomous navigation technologies that can meet the complexities of next generation space missions. A solution to this challenge might involve one of the hottest topics in optical physics to emerge in the last decade: the use of exceptional points or fast light to dramatically increase the sensitivity of optical cavities to changes in optical path length. These effects were directly observed for the first time in experiments at MSFC, which obtained enhancements in sensitivity as large as 360 and led to the first demonstration of the enhancement in a closed-loop device. The boost in sensitivity could enable more rapid and precise inertial measurements, with smaller gyros, translating to greater spacecraft autonomy. I will discuss the challenges and prospects for the improvement of gyroscopes and accelerometers based on these concepts.
(MOWG) NASA Robotic CARA Satellite State Estimate Covariance
Presenter Megan Johnson
Published July 2019
Recorded February 2019
Duration 41:40
Tags None
(MOWG) NASA Robotic CARA Probability of Collision
Presenter Megan Johnson
Published July 2019
Recorded February 2019
Duration 42:46
Tags None
Numerical Method to Calculate Spacecraft Environmental Heating From Celestial Bodies
Presenter Allan Holtzman
Published July 2019
Recorded June 2019
Duration 10:15
Tags None
This talk is about a numerical method to calculate the environmental heating of a spacecraft near a celestial body. This method was applied on MESSENGER, the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury, and helped to protect the spacecraft throughout its life and increase the amount of science data returned for the mission. The technique would be useful also for lunar missions, and for spacecraft that come in close proximity to comets and asteroids, and other scenarios besides those.
Microwave Technology Development for Future Earth Science and Applications from Space
Presenter Dr. David Kunkee
Published June 2019
Recorded November 2018
Duration 01:02:46
Tags None
**Slides available via the "Download Slides" button under "Links." The National Academies released the pre-publication of its consensus study report entitled Thriving on Our Changing Planet: A Decadal Strategy for Earth Observation from Space in 2017 (ESAS 2017). This is the second such decadal survey with the primary objective which “recommendations for the environmental monitoring and Earth science and applications communities for an integrated and sustainable approach to the conduct of the U.S. government’s civilian space-based Earth-system science programs.” In the previous year, NASA’s Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) commissioned a study to support formulation of recommendations for microwave-based measurements from space that were in formulation within ESAS 2017. The report entitled “2016 NASA ESTO Microwave Technologies Review and Strategy,” contains recommendations for advancement of microwave technologies to enable or to reduce the cost and risk of candidate high-value microwave measurements for Earth Observation from space. This NASA Engineering Network Webinar will provide a brief overview of the ESTO microwave strategy and its application to ESAS 2017. This will be followed by several examples of current technology developments for active and passive microwave instruments. This presentation will be given in three sections by David Kunkee (The Aerospace Corp.), Jeff Piepmeier (Goddard Space Flight Center), and Greg Sadowy (Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
Building Your First SINDA Model
Presenter Steven L. Rickman
Published April 2019
Recorded April 2019
Duration 34:43
Tags None
In this lesson, we’ll discuss thermal modeling using the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer, or SINDA analysis software. This tool has existed in one form or another for more than 50 years and has undergone major improvements over time. Presently, different versions of SINDA are offered by a number of vendors. For this lesson, we are using a SINDA format offered by Cullimore and Ring Technologies, Incorporated. With minor modification, the models developed during this lesson can be adapted to other versions of SINDA. The use of this particular format during this lesson should not be construed as an endorsement of any product.
Applying GN&C Solutions to the Problem of Asteroid Interception for Planetary Defense
Presenter Nahum Melamed
Published March 2019
Recorded March 2018
Duration 51:48
Tags None
The impact consequences of Near Earth objects (NEO) require proactive measures to eliminate or reduce them when lead times are too short for effective deep space Deflection/destruction. To expand mitigation beyond deep space, ground-based pre-built interceptors launched minutes before atmospheric entry can respond to detection times from minutes to months. The disruption of a small NEO prior to atmospheric entry could potentially eliminate or reduce damage to the ground by dispersing its kinetic energy over a wider area. The Guidance and Control Subdivision at The Aerospace Corporation has applied interceptor techniques to engage an incoming NEO at high altitude minutes before atmospheric entry. Objective is to disrupt the object and deposit its kinetic energy at a higher altitude and disperse it over a wider footprint on the ground. Monte Carlo analysis duplicated statistical properties of real NEOs on NASA’s database. Interceptor requirements were linked with flight time and altitude of intercept. Preliminary results show that Exoatmospheric intercept altitudes are attainable even when detection and launch occur minutes before impact. Local, regional or national protection requirements determine the number of systems and response time. Terminal guidance and disruption and debris reentry analysis were identified key areas of future work.
Short Course on Lithium-ion Batteries: Fundamental Concepts, Battery Safety, and Modeling Techniques
Presenter William Walker
Published February 2019
Recorded November 2018
Duration 02:18:28
Tags None
Originally aired December 4, 2018. Disciplines: Passive Thermal, Electrical Power This short course provides participants with an in-depth discussion on three aspects of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. First an understanding of Li-ion battery fundamentals is provided through a brief discussion centered on the aerospace industry’s choice to use Li-ion batteries, general performance characteristics, electrochemical reaction basics, and the heat generated during nominal operation. Secondly, Li-ion battery safety is addressed with respect to thermal runaway and battery safety. Lastly, this course will lead the participants through the basic construction process of a thermal model of a Li-ion battery assembly that is capable of simulating nominal heating and thermal runaway heating. The overall goal of the course is to provide participants with an in-depth understanding of both the fundamental and thermal aspects of Li-ion batteries.
Residual Stress and Effect on Crack Growth and Fracture
Presenter Dr. Frederick W. (Bud) Brust
Published February 2019
Recorded October 2018
Duration 01:33:15
Tags None
Human Factors Discovered: Stories from the Front Lines
Presenter Dr. Randy Mumaw
Published November 2018
Recorded April 2018
Duration 56:16
Tags None
Recorded May 8, 2018 Randy has spent more than 3 decades thinking about how to improve human performance in complex, socio-technical systems. For most of that time, he was working with a system developer (Westinghouse or Boeing). That experience allowed him to be a witness to how human operators perform—what they do well and what happens that is different from what the system developer expected. In this presentation, Randy will offer operational “stories” to illustrate how humans use technology in unanticipated ways and how system designers fail to understand how difficult system operation is. He will also discuss the dilemma of quantifying human performance. Larger Human Factors themes will emerge.
FAA Overview: Software Certification for Avionics
Presenter Mark Roesch
Published October 2018
Recorded April 2019
Duration 01:23:00
Tags None
Project: NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR): Intelligent Information Processing System for Enhanced Safety in the NAS Project Acronym: IIPS Technical Abstract: IIPS is an information-centric, decision support, action-monitoring tool that focuses on information disconnects between actors or systems in a well-defined context and resolves those disconnects through progressively adaptive notifications. IIPS can also adapt to situations where information overload can saturate communications channels and overload the decision maker by providing the most relevant information at the most opportune time. The system goals include to improve safety performance for high-reliability flight systems, to permit scalable application from the flight deck to the systems operating at the level of the National Airspace System, and to permit easy integration of multiple disparate information sources using an open system architecture by using techniques which permit delaying unnecessary system constraints throughout the development process. One of the Technical Objectives (TO) for IIPS namely, TO #4 is to Identify and formalize the software development requirements for eventual deployment to an environment requiring FAA certification. The presentation provided here is the outcome of research associated with this TO #4. Some of the information provided here is common to any FAA certification specifically associated with software design assurance and hence is provided in this forum for information sharing.
Antimonide Based Infrared Detectors and Focal Plane Arrays for NASA Applications
Presenter Dr. Sanjay Krishna
Published September 2018
Recorded May 2018
Duration 51:07
Tags None
Mid infrared imaging (3-25 micrometers) has been an important technological tool for the past 60 years since the first report of infrared detectors in 1950s. There has been a dramatic progress in the development of antimonide based detectors and low power electronic devices in the past decade with new materials like InAsSb, InAs/GaSb superlattices and InAs/InAsSb superlattices demonstrating very good performance. One of the unique aspects of the 6.1A family of semiconductors (InAs, GaSb and AlSb) is the ability to engineer the bandstructure to obtain designer band-offsets. Their group recently moved to The Ohio State University where they are setting up new capability for investigation of the antimonide based materials for infrared detectors and focal plane arrays. Their two areas of focus include developing a “materials to manufacturing” capability for realization of these sensors and exploration of novel application for the infrared sensors and imagers. (https://kind.engineering.osu.edu/) In this talk, Dr. Krishna will describe some of the material science and device physics of the antimonide systems. The use of “unipolar barrier engineering” to realize high performance infrared detectors and focal plane arrays will be discussed. He will define the current status of the technology and what are the current scientific and technical challenges. He will discuss some new ideas such as use of superlattices for single carrier impact ionization to realize low noise avalanche photodiodes and (b) using dielectric resonators to increase the signal to noise ratio of infrared detectors. He will also explore the possibility of realizing next generation infrared imaging systems. Using the concept of a bio-inspired infrared retina, I will make a case for an enhanced functionality in the pixel. The key idea is to engineer the pixel such that it not only has the ability to sense multimodal data such as color, polarization, dynamic range and phase but also the intelligence to transmit a reduced data set to the central processing unit.
7 Habits of Highly Effective (NASA) Systems Engineers
Presenter NASA
Published September 2018
Recorded September 2018
Duration 01:22:22
Tags None
Successful NASA projects are a complex balancing act of meeting scientific and technical requirements, while managing schedule, cost, and risk. In a Virtual Project Management Challenge (VPMC), we learned that highly effective program manager share key habits—habits that anyone can develop to improve their performance. In this follow up to that session, we turn our focus to systems engineers. Specifically, "What are the qualities of an effective systems engineer?" In addition to looking at the research, we asked our viewers. Hundreds of VPMC viewers responded, ranking the characteristics of effective systems engineers. In this session of the VPMC, we will present the top seven characteristics of effective systems engineers as identified by our viewer poll. For each characteristic, a NASA systems engineer will illustrate how they successfully applied that characteristic to their project work. In addition to describing the characteristic in action, each presenter will provide advice on how others might develop their project management competencies. Please note: presenters for this VPMC will appear via pre-recorded interviews, so there will not be a question and answer session.
Space Radiation Environments
Presenter Dr. Steven Koontz
Published February 2018
Recorded August 2017
Duration 01:31:56
Tags None
Disciplines: Environmental Control/Life Support, Space Environments US Spacesuit Knowledge Capture - Recorded June 29, 2017 The spaceflight ionizing radiation (IR) environment is dominated by very high-kinetic energy-charged particles with relatively smaller contributions from X-rays and gamma rays. The Earth’s surface IR environment is not dominated by the natural radioisotope decay processes. Dr. Steven Koontz’s lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics of space radiation environments, beginning with the space radiation environment on the International Space Station and moving outward through the Van Allen belts to cislunar space. The benefits and limitations of radiation shielding materials will also be summarized.
What Your Signature Means
Presenter Joe McMann
Published February 2018
Recorded December 2016
Duration 10:17
Tags None
Joe McMann discussed valuable lessons about the importance of a person’s signature, the cost of signing false documents, and the possible consequences of signing without reviewing the content of what you are attesting to be valid.
Wire and Wire Bundle Thermal Analysis
Time and Time Again: Basic Concepts
Presenter Dr. William Taber
Published January 2018
Recorded November 2017
Duration 01:03:01
Tags None
Aired November 15, 2017 "Time can be can be the most confusing aspect of astronomy." — Laurence G. Taft, Computational Spherical Astronomy Time is also confusing for those trying to use software from the various software sets in use at JPL if they are pre-SPICE/Monte. The time system in use can be: not known by the users, assumed to be understood, regarded as irrelevant, or use date dependent configurations that are not in sync. This talk was first given in January of 2012. However, time marches on and change comes with it. New people are in the section, people change jobs, leap seconds occur. This talk will go over: the various time systems in common use here, how they are used, and which one(s) to use if you have a choice in the matter.
Method for Simulation of Procedure Performance
Presenter Dr. Lance Sherry
Published December 2017
Recorded October 2017
Duration 51:16
Tags None
Recorded October 24, 2017 Airline Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) define the sequence of flight crew actions to handle the set of mission situations that can emerge in the execution of a commercial airline flight. Each SOP must be completed within an Allowable Operational Time Window (AOTW) to avoid a hazardous outcome. For dynamic plants (e.g. airliner) the Time on Procedure (ToP) and the AOTW are distributions that vary with the interactions between environment, plant, and operator actions. Making sure that new, or modified procedures, can be completed in a timely manner (i.e. ToP AOTW) is a critical step in verification of SOPs. This presentation describes a method to simulate the time distributions for SOPs. A case study analysis of the Take-off procedure is demonstrated resulting in a simulated ToP within 5% of the actual. The implications of these results for testing procedure design and limitations of this method are discussed.
“ABORT! ABORT!” - Applied Human Factors for Time-sensitive, Safety Critical Systems
Presenter Ronald Daiker
Published December 2017
Recorded September 2017
Duration 56:58
Tags None
Air date: November 14, 2017 A team of human factors researchers from NASA Langley Research Center have completed a four-month study aimed at improving the user interface of the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Safety Critical Range Data Display System (RDDS) used to support arm/destruct decisions during launch operations. WFF representatives reached out to Langley's Crew Systems and Aviation Operations Branch (CSAOB) for assistance in the area of user interface design, and the resulting study was funded by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). Lisa Rippy (D2), Ron Daiker (D318), Rania Ghatas (D318), and Michael Vincent (D318) have been collaborating with WFF personnel to develop data driven, user-centered software requirements in support of the WFF software re-design effort. The LaRC research team was invited to brief their findings to WFF Range and Safety leadership on August 9, 2017. Representatives from WFF commended the LaRC research team for their efforts and expressed interest in an on-going partnership between LaRC and WFF throughout the design, development, and fielding of the new Launch Termination System Software. This presentation will focus on the applied human factors methods and techniques employed to respond to this request for assistance within the agency, and the lessons learned from this study. As ambassadors for the human factors discipline, practitioners should always be prepared to answer the call for assistance from others both within and outside of the agency. The ability of HF practitioners to effectively represent the discipline and add value to a project is critical for the future growth and sustainment of the discipline. The role of applied human factors within the agency will also be discussed, along with recommendations which would benefit similar efforts in the future.
Training for Generalization in Technical Domains
Presenter Dr. Dorrit Billman
Published September 2017
Recorded July 2017
Duration 53:02
Tags None
Recorded August 8, 2017 Applying what you know in new situations, for new goals, or with different resources is a hallmark of successful learning. Generalizing what you know and transferring your skills and knowledge to new settings will be a key success factor in future long-distance exploration missions. In work domains relying on use of complex technology, we propose that these three types of skills and knowledge enable generalization: a) a mental model of a device, b) procedures for carrying out work using the device, and particularly, c) an integrated understanding of relationships between the device and procedures for using it. Our research investigates this proposal. Here we report results from an exploratory study of how training for integration affects performance on generalizing to tasks varying in similarity to the training tasks.
ISS Operations Overview Part 2: Mission Activities vs. Science Goals
Presenter Michael Jensen
Published September 2017
Recorded June 2017
Duration 01:01:21
Tags None
Recorded July 18, 2017 ISS is a research platform and as an Agency we want to maximize its value to the nation and our partners. It is also an outpost in a hazardous environment that requires maintenance, cargo and crew transfers and various tasks that can interfere with maximizing science time on the platform. We will discuss the four assets typically required for science activities, and then review the various mission activities that we must accomplish to maintain and operate the vehicle, understanding how they challenge us to maximize science time. We wrap the section up with a summary of changes both accomplished and in-work to improve our science availability.
Thermal Hardware for Thermal Analysts
Presenter David Steinfeld
Published August 2017
Recorded July 2017
Duration 01:11:03
Tags None
Discipline: Passive Thermal
Assessing the Human for Flight
Presenter Dr. Gregg Bendrick
Published June 2017
Recorded May 2017
Duration 01:00:04
Tags None
Virtually all regulatory agencies around the world require some type of medical assessment of pilots (and astronauts) to ensure they are medically qualified for flight duties. Medical examination in these cases in distinct from the normal, “clinical” practice of medicine because one is determining medical qualification for a particular series of tasks, and not diagnosing or treating disease. Hence, the medical examiner acts on behalf of the regulatory agency to help ensure safety of flight. In this context medical assessment entails: 1) The performance of specific examination REQUIREMENTS (which can vary depending on the type and duration of flight), then; 2) Identifying whether or not the individual meets specified STANDARDS, and if not; 3) Determining the appropriate WAIVER questions or concerns that must be satisfactorily addressed before a safe return to flight can be implemented. Specific areas to be covered include the unique concerns of the aviation and space environments, the “1% Rule”, and the shift in focus in recent years from screening tests to risk factor identification as the better way to mitigate medical risk of flight. Likewise, medical examination involves medical SURVEILLANCE, in which the individual is assessed to determine if he or she demonstrates untoward health effects as a result of working in an abnormal environment. Time for questions and answers will be available at the end of the talk.
Nano Chem Sensors
Presenter Dr. Jing Li
Published June 2017
Recorded June 2017
Duration 51:05
Tags None
Nanotechnology offers the ability to work at the molecular level, atom by atom, to create large structures with fundamentally new molecular organization. It is essentially concerned with materials, devices, and systems whose structures and components exhibit novel and significantly improved physical, chemical and biological properties, phenomena, and process control due to their nanoscale size. A nanosensor technology has been developed at NASA Ames using nanostructure, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), combined with silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining process. The nanosensors have achieved low detection limit of chemicals in the concentration range of ppm to ppb. More than 16 chemicals have been tested and differentiated. Due to large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and a more robust solution than most state-of-the-art systems making them attractive for space and defense applications, as well as a variety of commercial applications. Leveraging the micromachining technology, the light weight and compact sensors can be fabricated, in wafer scale for mass production, with high yield and at low cost. An example of a sensor module, the first space flown nano device, and a smartphone-sensor will be introduced in this presentation. Such sensors have drawn attention from space community for global weather monitoring, space exploration, life search in the universe, and launch pad fuel leak detection and in-flight cabin air and life support system monitoring, and engine operation monitoring. Additionally, the wireless capability of such sensors can be leveraged to network mobile and fixed-base detection and warning systems for civilian population centers, military bases and battlefields, as well as other high-value or high-risk assets and areas in industry. In this presentation, lessons learned and future direction will be discussed for utilizing the technology for real world applications.
Exhaust Simulation Methods
Presenter Bob Berrier
Published June 2017
Recorded April 2017
Duration 59:46
Tags None
Discipline: Aerosciences Fran Capone, Bob Berrier and Larry Leavitt spent a majority of their NASA careers at the LaRC 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel conducting research in propulsion airframe integration (PAI). From WWII through its closure in 2004, the 16 Ft was at the center of PAI testing – practically every military vehicle was tested there. Fran, Bob and Larry have a tremendous amount of experience conducting PAI testing on a wide range of vehicles including DoD, commercial and space. Through the years, they developed several training modules for new employees on conducting wind tunnel tests with an emphasis on powered testing and PAI. They have graciously agreed to dust off some of those training presentations and share their knowledge with the NASA community.
Why Do We Need Propulsion Testing? Thoughts on Bookkeeping
Presenter Bob Berrier
Published June 2017
Recorded April 2017
Duration 16:56
Tags None
Discipline: Aerosciences Fran Capone, Bob Berrier and Larry Leavitt spent a majority of their NASA careers at the LaRC 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel conducting research in propulsion airframe integration (PAI). From WWII through its closure in 2004, the 16 Ft was at the center of PAI testing – practically every military vehicle was tested there. Fran, Bob and Larry have a tremendous amount of experience conducting PAI testing on a wide range of vehicles including DoD, commercial and space. Through the years, they developed several training modules for new employees on conducting wind tunnel tests with an emphasis on powered testing and PAI. They have graciously agreed to dust off some of those training presentations and share their knowledge with the NASA community.
Propulsion Tares - Where Do They Come From and How Do You Find Them?
Presenter Larry Leavitt
Published June 2017
Recorded April 2017
Duration 43:37
Tags None
Discipline: Aerosciences Fran Capone, Bob Berrier and Larry Leavitt spent a majority of their NASA careers at the LaRC 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel conducting research in propulsion airframe integration (PAI). From WWII through its closure in 2004, the 16 Ft was at the center of PAI testing – practically every military vehicle was tested there. Fran, Bob and Larry have a tremendous amount of experience conducting PAI testing on a wide range of vehicles including DoD, commercial and space. Through the years, they developed several training modules for new employees on conducting wind tunnel tests with an emphasis on powered testing and PAI. They have graciously agreed to dust off some of those training presentations and share their knowledge with the NASA community.
ISS Operations Overview Part 1: Spacecraft & Launch Vehicles
Presenter Michael Jensen
Published June 2017
Recorded April 2017
Duration 58:51
Tags None
To staff, supply and maintain our outpost in low earth orbit, the ISS requires a steady stream of crew and cargo vehicles. Part 1 of this briefing focuses on a summary of the various spacecraft that get people and cargo up and ‘back’ from the ISS. We will compare and contrast their capabilities and functions they provide to the program.
Aerodynamic Performance Testing
Presenter Fran Capone
Published May 2017
Recorded April 2017
Duration 42:31
Tags None
Discipline: Aerosciences Fran Capone, Bob Berrier and Larry Leavitt spent a majority of their NASA careers at the LaRC 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel conducting research in propulsion airframe integration (PAI). From WWII through its closure in 2004, the 16 Ft was at the center of PAI testing – practically every military vehicle was tested there. Fran, Bob and Larry have a tremendous amount of experience conducting PAI testing on a wide range of vehicles including DoD, commercial and space. Through the years, they developed several training modules for new employees on conducting wind tunnel tests with an emphasis on powered testing and PAI. They have graciously agreed to dust off some of those training presentations and share their knowledge with the NASA community.
Orbiter Water Dump Nozzle Redesign Lessons Learned
Presenter Henry A Rotter Jr.
Published May 2017
Recorded March 2017
Duration 58:22
Tags None
Hank Rotter, NASA Technical Fellow for the Environmental Control and Life Support System, will provide the causes and lessons learned for the two Space Shuttle Orbiter water dump icicles that formed on the side of the Orbiter. He will present the root causes and the criticality of these icicles, along with the redesign of the water dump nozzles and lessons learned during the redesign phase.
Lithium Ion Battery Thermal Propagation Modeling: Considerations and Lessons Learned
Presenter Dr. Bruce Drolen
Published April 2017
Recorded March 2017
Duration 18:38
Tags None
Discipline: Passive Thermal
Exploring Mars with the NASA Mars Science Laboratory Rover
Presenter Dr. Tim Olson
Published April 2017
Recorded February 2017
Duration 01:19:06
Tags None
Webcast Air Date: March 21, 2017 Since August 2012, the NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has been operating on the Martian surface. The primary goal of the MSL mission is to assess whether Mars ever had an environment suitable for life. MSL Science Team member Dr. Tim Olson will provide an overview of the rover’s capabilities and the major findings from the mission so far. He will also share some of his experiences of what it is like to operate Curiosity’s science cameras and explore Mars as part of a large team of scientists and engineers.
Fundamentals of Spacecraft Control-Structure Interaction
Presenter Dr. Davin Swanson
Published March 2017
Recorded January 2017
Duration 01:03:51
Tags None
Discipline: Guidance, Navigation & Control Webcast Air Date: March 15, 2017 Flexibility and nonlinearities in a spacecraft or launch vehicle’s structure can interact with control loops, potentially impacting pointing performance or creating instabilities or limit cycles. These effects can cause mission degradation or even loss of vehicle. In order to successfully assess the interplay between controls and structures, a cross-discipline design and analysis process must be established and followed throughout the development phase of a program. This presentation provides an introduction to the fundamentals of control-structure interaction, providing an overview of the design process, some examples and rules of thumb, and references for further study. Topics addressed include structural model accuracy and validation, structural damping, model reduction, model uncertainty, and common control design and analysis techniques.
The Apollo Experience Lessons Learned for Lunar Dust Management
Presenter Sandra Wagner
Published March 2017
Recorded February 2017
Duration 40:06
Tags None
In 2008, NASA was embarking on its Exploration Vision, knowing that many technical challenges would be encountered. For lunar exploration missions, one challenge was to learn to manage lunar dust. References to problems associated with lunar dust during the Apollo Program were found on many of pages of the mission reports and technical debriefs. All engineers designing hardware that would come into contact with lunar dust had to mitigate its effects in the design.
Introduction to the International Space Station
Presenter Dr. Donna Dempsey
Published March 2017
Recorded February 2017
Duration 57:02
Tags None
Discipline: Human Factors Webcast Air Date: March 14, 2017 This presentation introduces the audience to the International Space Station (ISS) modules. Each of the modules is presented and the function or purpose of the module is briefly described. Time permitting, the presentation will end with a video sequence showing the assembly of the ISS and a separate video showing a tour of the interior of the ISS.
Crew Health/Performance Improvements & Resource Impacts with Reduced CO2 Levels
Presenter Dr. John James
Published March 2017
Recorded February 2017
Duration 34:48
Tags None
There have been a cluster of anecdotal reports that ISS crews are experiencing adverse health effects from on orbit exposure to CO2 levels well below the current Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC), which is 5.3 mmHg for 180 days of exposure. Developing evidence that this standard should be reduced to protect crew health is not a simple process. Dr. John James’ team looked at the reports of headaches by the crew during private medical conferences and matched these with CO2 levels around the time of these reports. They then compared these to CO2 levels when there were no reports of headache. Using benchmark dose modeling, they found that the risk of headache could be predicted in concentration ranges from 2 to 5 mmHg. However, the data are incomplete because there were insufficient data when crews were exposed to concentrations below 2 mmHg. James’ team also asked whether neuro-cognitive effects could be identified with CO2 exposure levels and found that these could not be associated with CO2 levels. Finally, they addressed the question of resource use to meet various levels of CO2 control if the SMACs were lowered. They estimated that CO2 restrictions approaching 2 mmHg would require substantial increases in power use and up-mass resources. They are refining their data on CO2 and headaches, and are looking at potential interactions of intracranial pressure and CO2 levels in eliciting ocular effects.
Real-Time Extravehicular Activity Troubleshooting
Presenter Dr. Scott Parazynski
Published March 2017
Recorded January 2017
Duration 01:20:13
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support Originally recorded February 16, 2012 Dr. Parazynski focused on the Shuttle Transportation System (STS)-120 Solar Array Repair Extravehicular Activity (EVA) with personal anecdotes and then spoke about what it takes to have a successful EVA during the event, what types of problems can occur during an EVA, particularly with the spacesuit and the safety of the crew, and how to resolve these quickly, safely, and efficiently. He also described the participants and the types of decisions and actions each had to take to ensure success. He described “Team 4,” in Houston and on-orbit, as well as anecdotes from his STS-86 and STS-100 missions. Parazynski provided a retrospective on the EVA tools and procedures NASA used in the aftermath of Columbia for shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspection and repair. He described his role as the lead astronaut during this effort, and covered all the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), KC-135, precision air-bearing floor (PABF), vacuum chamber, and 1-G testing performed to develop the tools and techniques that were flown. Parazynski discussed how the EVA community worked together to resolve a huge safety issue, and how his work in the spacesuit was critical to overcoming a design limitation of the Space Shuttle.
STS-41G Extravehicular Activity
Presenter David Leestma
Published March 2017
Recorded February 2017
Duration 48:07
Tags None
David Leestma was EV-1 for the STS-41G extravehicular activity (EVA) with Kathy Sullivan (first American female spacewalker). They conducted an EVA to fully demonstrate the feasibility of refueling satellites from the Space Shuttle, and performed the first contingency EVA task involving the Ku-band antenna. STS-41G was the fourth Space Shuttle mission to perform an EVA, and Leestma related his experiences with training, the spacesuit, and EVA tasks that were conducted on October 11, 1984 during this mission.
Radiation Engineering for Designers 04: Component Selection & Radiation Effects Mitigation, Part 3
Radiation Engineering for Designers 05: Radiation Testing, Part 2
Water Quality Module
Presenter John Steele
Published February 2017
Recorded January 2017
Duration 52:42
Tags None
John Steele, a chemist and technical fellow from United Technologies Corporation, provided a water quality module to assist engineers and scientists with a metric tool to evaluate risks associated with the design of space systems with fluid loops. This design metric is a methodical, quantitative, lessons-learned based means to evaluate the robustness of a long-term fluid loop system design. The tool was developed by a cross-section of engineering disciplines who had decades of experience and problem resolution
Apollo Lunar Surface Operations and Extravehicular Activity Suit Issues
Presenter Dr. Richard Scheuring
Published February 2017
Recorded February 2017
Duration 01:16:04
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support The potential risk of injury to crew members is inherent in aggressive surface activities, whether they be Moon-, Mars-, or asteroid-based. In December 2005, the Space Medicine Division at JSC requested a study to identify Apollo mission issues that had an impact to crew health or performance or both. This talk focused on the Apollo EVA suit and lunar surface operations concerning crew health and performance. There were roughly 20 recommendations from this study of Apollo for improving these two areas for future exploration missions, a few of which were incorporated into the Human Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR). Dr. Richard Scheuring covered these topics along with some of the analog work that has been done regarding surface operations and medical contingencies.
CO2 Washout Testing of NASA Spacesuits
Presenter Jason Norcross
Published February 2017
Recorded January 2017
Duration 01:10:49
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support During the presentation “CO2 Washout Testing of NASA Spacesuits,” Jason Norcross discussed the results of recent carbon dioxide CO2 washout testing of NASA spacesuits including the Rear Entry I-suit (REI), Enhanced Mobility Advanced Crew Escape Suit (EM-ACES), and possibly the ACES and Z-1 EVA prototype. When a spacesuit is used during ground testing, adequate CO2 washout must be provided for the suited subject. Symptoms of acute CO2 exposure depend on the partial pressure of CO2 (ppCO2) available to enter the lungs during respiration. The primary factors during ground-based testing that influence the ppCO2 level in the oronasal area include the metabolic rate of the subject and air flow through the suit. These tests were done to characterize inspired oronasal ppCO2 for a range of workloads and flow rates for which ground testing is nominally performed. During this presentation, Norcross provided descriptions of the spacesuits, test hardware, methodology, and results, as well as implications for future ground testing and verification of flight requirements.
Extravehicular Activity Power, Avionics and Software 101
Presenter Dr. David Irimies
Published February 2017
Recorded December 2016
Duration 44:39
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support Originally recorded May 6, 2011 EVA (extravehicular activity) systems consist of a spacesuit or garment, a PLSS (portable life support system), a PAS (power, avionics, and software) system, and spacesuit interface hardware. The PAS system is responsible for providing power for the suit, communication of several types of data between the suit and other mission assets, avionics hardware to perform numerous data display and processing functions, and information systems that provide crewmembers data to perform their tasks with more autonomy and efficiency. Irimies discussed how technology development efforts have advanced the state-of-the-art in these areas and shared technology development challenges.
Radiation Engineering for Designers 02: Natural Space Radiation Environment
Radiation Engineering for Designers 04: Component Selection & Radiation Effects Mitigation, Part 1
Fundamentals of Libration Point Mission Design - Applications
Presenter David Folta
Published January 2017
Recorded January 2017
Duration 01:06:26
Tags None
Discipline: Guidance, Navigation & Control Webcast Air Date: January 18, 2017 With the fundamentals of libration point mission design essentially understood, application of these multi-body environment basics is being pursued through research and the incorporation of these techniques into the operational mission design process. The vicinity near and through libration points has been exploited by many missions both as the desired science location as well as gateways to attain unique science orbits. Such mission scenarios offer exceptional opportunities but involve complex and competing requirements. The libration point orbit mathematical foundations and dynamical structures are evolving to enable the real-world applications. For example, the construction of periodic orbits and their stable and unstable manifolds are routinely generated as initial conditions for final trajectory optimization in operational mission design tools. This webcast includes a discussion of the basics of libration point astrodynamics and the application of these mathematical constructs to design such trajectories.
Radiation Engineering for Designers 04: Component Selection & Radiation Effects Mitigation, Part 2
Testing and Analysis of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells
Presenter Dr. Chauncey Wu
Published January 2017
Recorded December 2016
Duration 01:14:52
Tags None
The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells, manufactured using a fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles vary continuously around the shell circumference from 10 degrees on the shell crown and keel, to 45 degrees on the shell sides. The two shells differ in that one shell has the full 24-tow course applied during each pass of the fiber placement system, while the second shell uses the fiber placement system s tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform shell wall thickness. The shells are tested in axial compression, and estimates of their prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads are generated using linear finite element analyses. Cutouts, scaled to represent commercial aircraft passenger and cargo doors, are then machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of the shells with cutouts are then computed using linear finite element analyses. When retested, large deflections were observed around the cutouts, but the shells carried an average of over 90 percent of the axial stiffness, and 85 percent of the buckling loads, of the shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions in performance demonstrate the potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of typical design features on the overall structural performance. Previous studies have typically shown poor correlation between experimental buckling loads and supporting linear bifurcation buckling analyses. The good correlation noted for these tow-steered shells may result from their circumferential axial stiffness variation, which may reduce sensitivity to geometric imperfections. A numerical investigation was performed using measured geometric imperfections from both shells. Finite element models of both shells were analyzed first without, and then, with the measured imperfections, superposed in different orientations around the shell longitudinal axis. Small variations in both the axial prebuckling stiffness and global buckling load of the shells were noted for the range of orientations studied.
Learning from the Past and Looking to the Future 03: Liftoff Facilitated Discussion
Learning from the Past and Looking to the Future 12: System Integration
Learning from the Past and Looking to the Future 11: Culture Panel
An Interview with Joe McMann: His Life Lessons
Presenter Joe McMann
Published January 2017
Recorded November 2016
Duration 01:10:16
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support Pica Kahn conducted “An Interview with Joe McMann: His Life Lessons” on May 23, 2011. With over 40 years of experience in the aerospace industry, McMann has gained a wealth of knowledge. Many have been interested in his biography, progression of work at NASA, impact on the U.S. spacesuit, and career accomplishments. This interview highlighted the influences and decision-making methods that impacted his technical and management contributions to the space program. McMann shared information about the accomplishments and technical advances that committed individuals can make.
Interviews with Apollo Astronauts
Presenter Dr. Dean Eppler
Published December 2016
Recorded July 2016
Duration 59:12
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support A 3-person team interviewed 8 of the 11 surviving Apollo crewmembers in a series of focused interviews to discuss their experiences on the lunar surface. Eppler presented the results of these interviews, along with recommendations for the design of future lunar surface systems.
I Didn't Know I Couldn't Do That
Presenter Dan Harrison
Published December 2016
Recorded September 2016
Duration 32:06
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support Dan Harrison will discuss overcoming institutional and cultural obstacles that he encountered during his more than 35-year career in engineering and engineering management. He will discuss why it is important to challenge the “unwritten laws” and the status quo that large organizations develop that are contrary to the end-goal of safe, affordable space exploration.
Two Phase Flows and Heat Transfer, Part 2
Presenter Dr. Henry Nahra
Published December 2016
Recorded September 2016
Duration 01:26:45
Tags None
Discipline: Passive Thermal
Damage Arresting Composites, Part 2: Large-Scale Multi-Bay Box
Presenter Dr. Adam Przekop
Published December 2016
Recorded October 2016
Duration 01:19:40
Tags None
Webcast Air Date: 12/09/2016 Discipline: Structures NASA conducted the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to explore and document the feasibility, benefits, and technical risk of advanced vehicle configurations and enabling technologies that will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations that have higher lift to drag ratios, reduced drag, and lower community noise. Although such novel configurations like the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) offer better aerodynamic performance as compared to traditional tube-and-wing aircraft, the blended wing shape with its almost-flat sided pressure vessel poses significant design challenges. Developing an improved structural concept for a non circular pressurized cabin is the primary obstacle in implementing large lifting body designs. To address this challenge, researchers at NASA and The Boeing Company worked together to advance new structural concepts like the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), which is an integrally stiffened panel design that is stitched together and designed to maintain residual load carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. A building block approach was used in this technology development effort. This topic is being addressed in two parts. Part one, presented by Dawn Jegley on 10/05/2016, was focused on the structural building blocks from small elements through large panels designed to demonstrate that the concept of out-of-autoclave cured, stitched composite structure with no mechanical fasteners in the acreage of flat and curved panels would efficiently support the axial, bending internal cabin pressure loads representative of the passenger compartment of a HWB vehicle. In part two, Adam Przekop will focus on the design, analysis and testing of the complex pressurized structures of a PRSEUS “cube” and a 30-foot-long, 80%-scale, multi-bay box. All building blocks and the built-up structures were analyzed and tested and the results documented to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept for application to commercial transport aircraft.
Learning from the Past and Looking to the Future 02: Rollout Loads
Two Phase Flows and Heat Transfer, Part 1
Presenter Dr. Henry Nahra
Published December 2016
Recorded September 2016
Duration 01:23:02
Tags None
Discipline: Passive Thermal
History of Underwater Simulation of Weightlessness for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Training, Part 2
Presenter Dr. John Charles
Published December 2016
Recorded August 2016
Duration 01:07:51
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support The technique of neutral buoyancy during water immersion was applied to a variety of questions pertaining to human performance factors in the early years of the space age. It was independently initiated by numerous aerospace contractors at nearly the same time, but specific applications depended on the problems that the developers were trying to solve. Those problems dealt primarily with human restraint and maneuverability and were often generic across extravehicular activity (EVA) and intravehicular activity (IVA) worksites. The same groups often also considered fractional gravity as well as weightless settings and experimented with ballasting to achieve lunar and Mars-equivalent loads as part of their on-going research and development. Dr. John Charles reviewed the association of those tasks with contemporary perceptions of the direction of NASA’s future space exploration activities and with Air Force assessments of the military value of man in space.
History of Underwater Simulation of Weightlessness for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Training, Part 1
Presenter Dr. John Charles
Published December 2016
Recorded August 2016
Duration 01:02:36
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support An attempt to clarify some vague memories of underwater studies of astronaut capabilities in space led Dr. John Charles to become acquainted with Sam Mattingly, one of the pioneers in the field, and to greater insights into Mattingly’s work simulating Gemini EVAs in the mid-1960s. Charles recounted major accomplishments by Environmental Research Associates (ERA), Mattingly’s company for contracting with NASA Langley on several early studies. ERA’s work was considered within the context of contemporary efforts to simulate weightlessness and the widespread development of neutral buoyancy facilities after ERA’s successful demonstration for Gemini 12.
Learning from the Past and Looking to the Future 04: Stud Hangup, Part 1
Learning from Doing - Model Based Systems Engineering Pathfinder Lessons Harvest and Next Steps
Presenter Jon Holladay
Published November 2016
Recorded October 2016
Duration 01:03:40
Tags None
Webcast Air Date: 10/28/2016 Discipline: Systems Engineering Are you curious about real NASA challenges and hands-on evaluation of 21st Century tools and technologies, and/or just learning more about what’s easy and what’s hard when it comes to implementing Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)? Join us for a webcast to hear Adam West discuss the NASA OCE Cloud deployment and Karen Weiland describe accomplishments, findings and observations from NASA’s recently completed MBSE Pathfinder, Phase 1 activities.
Fundamentals of Libration Point Mission Design
Presenter Dr. Kathleen Howell
Published November 2016
Recorded October 2016
Duration 58:36
Tags None
Discipline: Guidance, Navigation & Control Webcast Air Date: October 19, 2016 The vicinity near the Earth-Moon libration points has recently emerged as a potential location to support future crewed and robotic missions as part of a resilient and evolving space infrastructure. Beyond cislunar space, successful missions to the vicinity of the Sun-Earth/Moon libration points have also been accomplished and other Sun-planet and planet-moon options are being explored. Such mission scenarios offer unprecedented opportunities but involve complex and competing requirements. The mathematical foundations and dynamical structures in this multi-body environment are exploited for trajectory design in planning missions of this type and a new generation of strategies and analysis tools are evolving to enable the practical implementation of the complex new concepts. In particular, the existence of periodic orbits throughout a libration point region serves as a framework and the connections between various families allows movement throughout the region. This webcast will include a discussion of the astrodynamics basics to design such trajectories and some techniques to leverage the dynamical structures.
Learning from the Past and Looking to the Future 01: Introduction to Loads & Dynamics and System Integration
Exploration of Mars with the ChemCam LIBS Instrument and the Curiosity Rover
Presenter Dr. Horton Newsom
Published November 2016
Recorded October 2016
Duration 01:02:49
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support Webcast Air Date: October 25, 2016 The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover landed on Mars in August 2012, and has been exploring the planet ever since. Dr. Horton E. Newsom will discuss the MSL’s design and main goal, which is to characterize past environments that may have been conducive to the evolution and sustainability of life. He will also discuss Curiosity’s science payload, distance imaging, and spectroscopy, along with analytical capabilities and direct discoveries of the Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instrument. ChemCam is the first Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) to operate on another planetary surface and determine the chemistry of the rocks and soils.
Damage Arresting Composites, Part 1: Building Blocks
Presenter Dawn Jegley
Published October 2016
Recorded September 2016
Duration 01:56:00
Tags None
Discipline: Structures Webcast Air Date: October 5, 2016 NASA conducted the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to explore and document the feasibility, benefits, and technical risk of advanced vehicle configurations and enabling technologies that will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations that have higher lift to drag ratios, reduced drag, and lower community noise. Although such novel configurations like the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) offer better aerodynamic performance as compared to traditional tube-and-wing aircraft, the blended wing shape with its almost-flat sided pressure vessel poses significant design challenges. Developing an improved structural concept for a non circular pressurized cabin is the primary obstacle in implementing large lifting body designs. To address this challenge, researchers at NASA and The Boeing Company worked together to advance new structural concepts like the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), which is an integrally stiffened panel design that is stitched together and designed to maintain residual load carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. A building block approach was used in this technology development effort. This topic will be addressed in two parts. Part one will focus on the structural building blocks from small elements through large panels designed to demonstrate that the concept of out-of-autoclave cured, stitched composite structure with no mechanical fasteners in the acreage of flat and curved panels would efficiently support the axial, bending internal cabin pressure loads representative of the passenger compartment of a HWB vehicle. Part two, to be covered in a separate webcast, will focus on the design, analysis and testing of the complex pressurized structures of a PRSEUS “cube” and a 30-foot-long, 80%-scale, multi-bay box. All building blocks and the built-up structures were analyzed and tested and the results documented to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept for application to commercial transport aircraft.
Sandwich Structures Failure Modes and Their Prevention
Presenter Dr. Ronald Krueger
Published October 2016
Recorded September 2016
Duration 01:13:14
Tags None
Discipline: Structures Webcast Air Date: September 28, 2016 Typical damage modes in light honeycomb sandwich structures include face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture, both of which can pose a threat to the structural integrity of a component. These damage modes are of particular interest to aviation certification authorities since several in-service occurrences, such as rudder structural failure and other control surface malfunctions, have been attributed to face sheet/core disbonding. Extensive studies have shown that face sheet/core disbonding and core fracture can lead to damage propagation caused by internal pressure changes in the core. In order to identify, describe and address the phenomenon associated with facesheet/core disbonding, a reliable means of characterizing facesheet/core disbonding must be developed. In addition to the characterization tests, analysis tools are required, to help assess the likelihood of a structure exhibiting critical disbonding. These analysis tools need to be verified and validated. In this webcast, sandwich structures are introduced and their failure modes are discussed. Actual in-service occurrences are presented and a road map to standardization for facesheet/core disbonding in sandwich composite components is described. An overview is given on the development of test methods that yield a critical strain energy release rate associated with disbonding, with a focus on mode-I dominated loading conditions. Further, an analysis approach is discussed to compute energy release rates along an arbitrarily shaped disbond front. Finally, a brief summary of observations is presented and recommendations for improvements are provided.
Moving Cross Town or Cross the Solar System, Putting the Pieces Together - Launch Vehicle Mission Flow and Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)
Presenter Jon Holladay
Published October 2016
Recorded September 2016
Duration 01:14:19
Tags None
Disciplines: Guidance, Navigation & Control, Systems Engineering Webcast Air Date: October 7, 2016 Are you curious about how we would assemble a complex exploration class mission architecture in space or what it takes just to get a lot pieces integrated onto a LV and flown in the first place? Join us for a webcast to hear Neil Dennehy describe and discuss the challenges of Rendezvous and Capture and Jessica Knizhnik describe on-going work to digitally capture sounding rocket mission flows using Model Based Systems Engineering.
Common Thermal Modeling Mistakes, Part 2
Presenter Ruth Amundsen
Published October 2016
Recorded September 2016
Duration 58:19
Tags None
Discipline: Passive Thermal This presentation was recorded at the Thermal & Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS) on August 3rd, 2016. This course will cover the some of the common mistakes made in thermal modeling, and how to avoid them. Thermal Desktop will be used as a platform to demonstrate many of the common errors by both new analysts as well as experienced engineers in building a thermal model. Other non-software-associated errors will also be covered. Topics covered will include common errors in assumptions, materials, configurations, radiation, orbital analysis, and common faults in problem setup, analysis case runs and record-keeping. The course should help you as an engineer to watch for these common errors in the future, and help you avoid them.
Common Thermal Modeling Mistakes, Part 1
Presenter Ruth Amundsen
Published October 2016
Recorded September 2016
Duration 01:15:04
Tags None
Discipline: Passive Thermal This presentation was recorded at the Thermal & Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS) on August 3rd, 2016. This course will cover the some of the common mistakes made in thermal modeling, and how to avoid them. Thermal Desktop will be used as a platform to demonstrate many of the common errors by both new analysts as well as experienced engineers in building a thermal model. Other non-software-associated errors will also be covered. Topics covered will include common errors in assumptions, materials, configurations, radiation, orbital analysis, and common faults in problem setup, analysis case runs and record-keeping. The course should help you as an engineer to watch for these common errors in the future, and help you avoid them.
Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity (IEVA) Apollo Spacesuits
Presenter Ken Thomas
Published September 2016
Recorded August 2016
Duration 01:22:10
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support Webcast Air Date: 08/31/2016 Kenneth Thomas, the author of the book U.S. Spacesuits, will discuss the Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity (IEVA) Apollo spacesuits, which supported launch, reentry, and EVA. This program was NASA’s first attempt to develop a new suit design from requirements and concepts. Mr. Thomas will chronical the challenges, developments, struggles, and solutions that culminated in the system that allowed the first human exploration of the Moon and deep space (outside low-Earth orbit). Apollo pressure suit designs allowed the heroic repair of Skylab and supported the first U.S. and Russian spacecraft docking during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Mr. Thomas will also discuss the IEVA suits’ successes and challenges associated with the developments of the 1960s.
Human Factors of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems: Lessons from Incident Reports
Presenter Dr. Alan Hobbs
Published September 2016
Recorded September 2016
Duration 01:00:27
Tags None
Discipline: Human Factors Webcast Air Date: September 13, 2016 Before remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) can operate routinely and safely in civilian airspace, we need to understand the unique human factors associated with these aircraft. Minor incidents are a potentially rich source of data, however, the RPAS sector has produced relatively few incident reports that describe events from the perspective of RPAS pilots. An exploratory study was conducted to examine the feasibility of collecting voluntary incident reports from RPAS pilots. Twenty-three experienced RPAS pilots volunteered to participate in focus groups in which they were invited to recall incidents that revealed a system flaw, or that highlighted a case where the human operator contributed to system resilience or mission success. Participants reported a total of 90 incidents. Some of the issues described in the reports have received significant attention in the literature, or are analogous to human factors of manned aircraft. In other cases, incidents involved human factors that have not yet been the subject of extensive study. Human factor issues included control station design considerations, vigilance during monotonous flights, transfer of control between control stations, the management of lost link procedures, and decision-making during emergencies. Although many of the reported incidents involved pilot errors, the participants also provided examples of the positive contribution that humans make to the operation of highly-automated systems.
GFSSP Training Course 12: User Subroutine (Updated)
Presenter Dr. Andre LeClair
Published September 2016
Recorded March 2019
Duration 18:00
Tags None
Updated Version
GFSSP Training Course 17: Model Integration & Future Developments
GFSSP Training Course 16: Psychrometric Properties and Multi-Layer Insulation
GFSSP Training Course 15: Rotating Flow, Turbopump & Heat Exchanger
GFSSP Training Course 14: Multi-Dimensional Flow Modeling
GFSSP Training Course 13: Fluid Mixture & Two-phase Flow
GFSSP Training Course 11: Data Structure
GFSSP Training Course 10: Cryogenic Propellant Loading
GFSSP Training Course 09: Pressure & Flow Regulator
GFSSP Training Course 08: Tank Pressurization, Control & Relief Valve
GFSSP Training Course 07: Mathematical Formulation
GFSSP Training Course 06: Fluid Transient
GFSSP Training Course 05: Pre & Post Processor, Part 2 (Updated)
Presenter Dr. Andre LeClair
Published September 2016
Recorded March 2019
Duration 33:00
Tags None
Discipline: Propulsion Updated Version
GFSSP Training Course 04: Resistance & Fluid Options
GFSSP Training Course 02: Pre & Post Processor, Part 1 (Updated)
Presenter Dr. Andre LeClair
Published August 2016
Recorded March 2019
Duration 46:00
Tags None
Discipline: Propulsion Updated version
GFSSP Training Course 03: Compressible Flow
Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) Training Course 01: Course Introduction
Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity (IEVA) Russian & Gemini Spacesuits
Presenter Ken Thomas
Published August 2016
Recorded July 2016
Duration 01:04:12
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support Webcast Air Date: 8/3/2016 Kenneth Thomas will discuss the Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity (IEVA) Russian & Gemini spacesuits, which were multi-purpose vehicle crew escape, survival, and extra-vehicular activity systems worn during launch and reentry. While the United States and Russia adapted to existing launch- and reentry-type suits to allow the first human ventures into the vacuum of space, there were differences in execution and capabilities. Mr. Thomas will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches compared to exclusively intra-vehicular or extra-vehicular suit systems.
Best Practices for Fatigue Risk Management in Non-traditional Shiftwork
Presenter Dr. Erin Flynn-Evans
Published July 2016
Recorded June 2016
Duration 58:56
Tags None
Discipline: Human Factors Webcast Air Date: July 12, 2016 Fatigue risk management programs provide effective tools to mitigate fatigue among shift workers. Although such programs are effective for typical shiftwork scenarios, where individuals of equal skill level can be divided into shifts to cover 24 hour operations, traditional programs are not sufficient for managing sleep loss among individuals with unique skill sets, in occupations where non-traditional schedules are required. Such operations are prevalent at NASA and in other high stress occupations, including among airline pilots, military personnel, and expeditioners. These types of operations require fatigue risk management programs tailored to the specific requirements of the mission. Without appropriately tailored fatigue risk management, such operations can lead to an elevated risk of operational failure, disintegration of teamwork, and increased risk of accidents and incidents. In order to design schedules for such operations, schedule planners must evaluate the impact of a given operation on circadian misalignment, acute sleep loss, chronic sleep loss and sleep inertia. In addition, individual-level factors such as morningness-eveningness preference and sleep disorders should be considered. After the impact of each of these factors has been identified, scheduling teams can design schedules that meet operational requirements, while also minimizing fatigue.
Learning from the Past and Looking to the Future 07: Pogo Heritage, Part 2
Learning from the Past and Looking to the Future 07: Pogo Heritage, Part 1
Thermal Blankets
Presenter Carol Mosier
Published June 2016
Recorded April 2016
Duration 45:59
Tags None
Discipline: Passive Thermal
Phobos: Simulation-Driven Design for Exploration
Presenter Dr. Zack Crues
Published May 2016
Recorded May 2016
Duration 45:33
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support Dr. Edwin “Zack” Crues presented an overview of the current use of modeling and simulation technologies by the NASA Exploration Systems Simulations (NExSyS) team in investigating the spacecraft and missions for the human exploration of Mars’ moon Phobos.
Mars Robotics and Things I Wish I’d Learned in College
Presenter John Baker
Published May 2016
Recorded April 2016
Duration 50:29
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support John D. Baker explored how Mars robotic missions are designed and operated. He also discussed a few basic concepts that will help future engineers and scientists develop key skills to use in aerospace projects.
Uses of Exergy in Systems Engineering
Presenter Andrew Gilbert
Published May 2016
Recorded April 2016
Duration 18:05
Tags None
Discipline: Systems Engineering
Skylab A-7LB Spacesuit Development for Skylab SL-2 through SL-4 Missions - Abridged Version
Presenter Jim McBarron
Published April 2016
Recorded June 2016
Duration 01:02:08
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support With over 50 years of experience with NASA spacesuit development and operations, as well as the U.S. Air Force pressure suit, Jim McBarron shared his significant knowledge about Skylab A-7LB spacesuit development. This included A-7LB extravehicular (EV) suit requirements and design changes implemented to establish the Skylab A-7LB EV suit design baseline. Additionally, he identified spacesuit experience for the Skylab SL-2 through SL-4 missions. He concluded by identifying noteworthy lessons learned.
Apollo A-7LB Spacesuit Development for Apollo 15 through 17 Missions - Abridged Version
Presenter Jim McBarron
Published April 2016
Recorded June 2016
Duration 54:53
Tags None
Discipline: Environmental Control/Life Support With over 50 years of experience with NASA spacesuit development and operations, as well as the U.S. Air Force pressure suit, Jim McBarron shared his significant knowledge about Apollo A-7LB spacesuit development. This included A-7L suit requirements and design changes implemented to establish the Apollo A-7LB extravehicular and A-7LB Command Module Pilot suit design baselines. Additionally, he identified tests performed for certification, and significant spacesuit configuration changes implemented to support the Apollo 15 through 17 missions, and he concluded by identifying noteworthy lessons learned.
Use of Akaike's Information Criterion to Assess the Quality of the First Mode Shape of a Flat Plate
Presenter Dr. John Doty
Published April 2016
Recorded March 2016
Duration 21:37
Tags None
Discipline: Systems Engineering