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20 most recent videos published to NESC Academy

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Development of a Venus Surface Wind Sensor
Presenter John Wrbanek
Published May 2022
Recorded April 2022
Duration 00:00
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: To better understand the atmospheric structure and dynamics on the Venus surface and provide input to climate models, there is a need to measure the wind velocity and direction on the surface and track changes over extended periods. A wind sensor based on a miniature drag-force anemometer is being developed to meet the challenges for wind measurements and operational requirements on the surface of Venus. The sensor materials are chosen to enhance durability and prevent reactivity with the Venus surface atmosphere. Advantages of this approach include that it is independent of variable heat transfer, has been matured in other harsh environment applications, and has a low mass and power requirement. Prototype drag-force anemometers were demonstrated, integrated with a high-temperature operational amplifier, recording transient effects in a simulated Venus surface environment. For multidirectional wind monitoring, the sensors are small enough to be deployed orthogonally as a three-dimensional array on a small arm or mast. This presentation describes the development and demonstration of this miniature drag-force anemometer integrated with high temperature electronics in a simulated Venus surface environment.
Facilitating (and not Interfering with) Work System Resilience with New Technology
Presenter Emily Patterson
Published May 2022
Recorded April 2022
Duration 58:07
Tags None
Traditionally, the negative unintended consequences of introducing new technologies into complex systems have not been explicitly assessed and mitigated. Recently, our understanding of how to identify, protect, and facilitate sources of resilience in a work system has advanced. In particular, there are lessons learned from two case studies of technologies: 1) voice loops, an auditory shared space that supported NASA Johnson communication and coordination, and 2) the introduction of bar coding in the medication administration process throughout the Veteran’s Health Administration. BCMA was designed to improve patient safety by reducing medication errors at the time of medication administration. During and after implementation, there were unintended consequences on the ability of work systems to: 1) have a shared awareness of demands and deviations, 2) progressively respond to changing circumstances, 3) guide local control with policies and procedures, 4) flexibly adapt by reducing constraints on actions, and 5) coordinate across the system.
Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation
Presenter Jose Santos
Published April 2022
Recorded April 2022
Duration 01:07:10
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: The Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of a scientific mission to a planetary body involving atmospheric flight is critical because the spacecraft must survive the extreme environment it encounters as it traverses the atmosphere. Mission designers must ensure the spacecraft's Thermal Protection System (TPS) can adequately protect the spacecraft, and the scientific payloads it carries. The EDL sequence is often regarded to be among the riskiest parts of the mission because there is little to no opportunity to take corrective action if a problem or anomaly is encountered. The Thermal Protection System is a single point of failure, and its design involves a robust sizing and margins process. Engineering instrumentation embedded within the Thermal Protection System provides valuable flight data to support verification and validation of analysis and simulation tools that are used for TPS design. This presentation will give an overview of in-situ EDL instrumentation used in atmospheric entry vehicles. Examples of different sensor types and recent instrumentation flown on NASA missions within the past decade will be presented, including the instrumentation suites flown on the Mars Science Laboratory, Mars 2020, and Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 missions. In addition, instrumentation that will fly on the Artemis 1 and 2, and Dragonfly missions will be described. Furthermore, sensor measurement accuracy and/or resolution for the current state-of-the-art, along with future needs, will also be discussed.
Success in Spaceflight: The Human System
Presenter Andrew Chaikin
Published April 2022
Recorded March 2022
Duration 01:03:34
Tags None
Instructions: - Please register to be kept in the loop should a schedule change occur. - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: What are the keys to success in spaceflight projects? What are the causes of failure? In this most unforgiving of human endeavors, the surprising answer is that the “rocket science” isn’t the hardest part. Ultimately, it comes down to how we think about the work, and the human behaviors that shape how we do the work. Success is critically dependent on such variables as whether or not we maintain a balance between ego and humility, and whether we remain open to new information that conflicts with our world view. It hinges on whether we indulge—even unconsciously—in all-too-common human behaviors like false perception of risk, hubris, groupthink, and that bane of technical organizations called the Not Invented Here syndrome. In spaceflight, we cannot afford those indulgences: They can be fatal. Fortunately, there are time-tested modes of thinking and behaviors that enhance our chances for success, when we choose to rigorously employ them.
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Orion Multi-Purpose Crew
Presenter Adam Amar
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:31:54
Tags None
Recorded July 9, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Propulsive Descent Technologies
Presenter Ashley Korzun
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:26:53
Tags None
Recorded August 2, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Material Response Modeling
Presenter Eric Stern
Published March 2022
Recorded October 2021
Duration 01:24:26
Tags None
Recorded July 12, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Wind Tunnel Testing Lecture
Presenter Brian Hollis
Published March 2022
Recorded August 2021
Duration 01:00:34
Tags None
Recorded July 29, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Mars Sample Return
Presenter Jim Corliss
Published March 2022
Recorded July 2021
Duration 01:15:00
Tags None
Recorded July 1, 2021
Mars Ascent Vehicle GNC Targeting Routines with Considerations for Flight Software Development
Presenter Jason Everett
Published March 2022
Recorded January 2022
Duration 01:02:01
Tags None
The Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) will be the first vehicle to perform an ascent from the surface of another atmospheric planetary body outside of the Earth‐Moon system. Significant light‐time delay requires complete autonomy of flight throughout ascent, and naturally a high level of reliability is desired in both MAV’s hardware and software subsystems. The MAV Guidance, Navigation and Controls (GNC) team and the MAV Flight Software (FSW) team have partnered together to improve the efficiency of algorithm integration onto the MAV flight processor, and to increase confidence that said integration is successful and without human error. An interface architecture is proposed for the GNC suite that allows both the guidance and navigation subsystems to provide code algorithms directly in C++, and the controls subsystem to provide MATLAB Simulink auto‐coded algorithms. Several continuous integration/deployment (CI/CD) methodologies have been considered for ease of transition of algorithm code from the GNC team to the FSW team. The GNC/FSW teams also worked together to develop a cFS‐friendly wrapper which abstracts the integration of the GNC algorithm code into an interface‐level API that is compatible with cFS. Several iterations of vehicle GNC code have been produced between the GNC/FSW team’s partnership, and this strong interface between these two teams have allowed the GNC/FSW teams to greatly increase confidence of efficient and error‐free implementation of the GNC code onto MAV for a successful flight.
Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS)-2 Instrument Development
Presenter Synthia Tonn
Published March 2022
Recorded March 2022
Duration 57:28
Tags None
Instructions: - Add this to your calendar for a convenient 15-minute reminder. - Slides and confirmation of attendance will be available to download approximately 30 minutes prior to the event. Refresh this page if not yet visible. - Please submit questions as they arise rather than waiting until the end. - Enjoy! Abstract: The Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS)-2 instrument is a two-band thermal imaging sensor flying on Landsat 9. Like its predecessor TIRS on Landsat 8, TIRS-2 produces radiometrically calibrated, geo-located thermal image data used operationally to monitor water consumption on a field-by-field basis in the U.S. West and internationally, among multiple other uses. This talk will provide an overview of the instrument and how it operates.
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Dragonfly / DrEAM
Presenter Michael Wright
Published March 2022
Recorded July 2021
Duration 01:20:13
Tags None
Recorded June 30, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Aerocapture and Aerogravity Assist
Presenter Soumyo Dutta
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:01:27
Tags None
Recorded August 5, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Entry Systems Modeling
Presenter Michael Barnhardt
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:24:00
Tags None
Recorded August 4, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: CFD 101
Presenter Kyle Thompson
Published March 2022
Recorded August 2021
Duration 01:15:48
Tags None
Recorded June 23, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Introduction To Radiative Heating
Presenter Brett Cruden
Published March 2022
Recorded August 2021
Duration 58:40
Tags None
Recorded July 6, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: High Enthalpy Testing
Presenter Earnest Fretter
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:24:38
Tags None
Recorded July 26, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Aerothermal Environments
Presenter Dinesh Prabhu
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:19:28
Tags None
Recorded July 6, 2021
NASA Langley/Ames EDL Seminar for Summer Interns: Computational Materials Modeling
Presenter Justin Haskins
Published March 2022
Recorded September 2021
Duration 01:21:50
Tags None
Recorded August 9, 2021
Human Centered Design Impact on Habitability and Mission Success
Presenter Michal Ziso
Published March 2022
Recorded March 2022
Duration 59:56
Tags None
Abstract: Architecture and the built environment have the power to influence and shape the way humans think, feel and ultimately perform. Those creating these environments have the power to ensure that the human impact is not only positive, but also one that contributes to habitability and mission success. Despite living in a fast-changing world - whether it be technology, social structures, climate, or human-centric factors - our built environment changes very slowly. This statement is valid on earth, and holds further significance in space. An interdisciplinary human centered design approach, offered by a diverse team of experts, could potentially aid in creating environments that meet the different goals, risks, challenges and astronaut personas for a specific mission. This talk will explore the potential influence of human centered design solutions on habitability and mission success from the perspective of both earth and space. From the efficiency of a standardized common solution to a tailored approach, the talk explores how human factors are incorporated into each
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