BEGIN:VCALENDAR PRODID:-//Microsoft Corporation//Outlook 16.0 MIMEDIR//EN VERSION:2.0 METHOD:PUBLISH X-MS-OLK-FORCEINSPECTOROPEN:TRUE BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:Eastern Standard Time BEGIN:STANDARD DTSTART:16011104T020000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=1SU;BYMONTH=11 TZOFFSETFROM:-0400 TZOFFSETTO:-0500 END:STANDARD BEGIN:DAYLIGHT DTSTART:16010311T020000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=2SU;BYMONTH=3 TZOFFSETFROM:-0500 TZOFFSETTO:-0400 END:DAYLIGHT END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VEVENT CLASS:PUBLIC CREATED:20191114T194240Z DESCRIPTION:The NASA Sensors & Instrumentation Community invites you to att end the following webcast:\nQuantum Technologies for Next Generation Senso r Networks Presented by Jason Mitchell \, GSFC - Open to the public (subject to change)\nWatc h & Share: https://go.nasa.gov/32SnYBX \n \nAbstract: \n \nAccurate refere nce clocks are critical to navigation. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)\, principally the Global Positioning System (GPS)\, provide the pr ecise space-based clocks that have revolutionized navigation and timekeepi ng terrestrially and within the Interoperable Space Service Volume (SSV)\, i.e.\, near Earth including above the GNSS constellations. Unfortunately\ , for spacecraft navigation beyond Earth into deep space\, GNSS is not ava ilable.\n \nWhile GNSS constellations are unavailable to spacecraft in dee p space\, observing X-ray emissions from rapidly spinning neutron stars\, called millisecond pulsars (MSPs)\, has been shown to fill that gap\; a pr ocess often referred to as X-ray Navigation (XNAV). MSPs are distributed t hroughout our galaxy and many pulsate at intervals so regular that they ri val terrestrial atomic clocks on long time scales\, similar to those clock s contained in GNSS satellites. By carefully timing these pulsations\, an XNAV equipped spacecraft can use these celestial lighthouses to autonomous ly determine its absolute position\, with uniform accuracy\, anywhere with in our Solar System and even beyond. This is in contrast to conventional p osition determination using Earth-based tracking\, in which a communicatio n link back to Earth is required and accuracy degrades as the distance fro m Earth grows.\n \nIn this webcast\, results will be presented of the Stat ion Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) demonstr ation\, which successfully executed the first on-orbit use of XNAV to perf orm autonomous onboard and real-time space navigation. SEXTANT was a NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development (GCD ) program funded technology enhancement to the Neutron-star Interior Compo sition Explorer (NICER) mission\, which is currently operating on the Inte rnational Space Station (ISS). \n \nWatch & Share: https://go.nasa.gov/32S nYBX\n DTEND;TZID="Eastern Standard Time":20191119T150000 DTSTAMP:20191114T194240Z DTSTART;TZID="Eastern Standard Time":20191119T140000 LAST-MODIFIED:20191114T194240Z LOCATION:Virtual (see enclosed) PRIORITY:5 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY;LANGUAGE=en-us:Sensors & Instrumentation Webcast: Demonstrating a G alactic Positioning System Using X-ray Emitting Millisecond Pulsars TRANSP:OPAQUE UID:040000008200E00074C5B7101A82E00800000000F08AD544F89AD501000000000000000 010000000AAA93A33764E02409177BB9E51B25820 X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

The NASA Sensors &\; Instrumentation Community invites you to atten d the following webcast:

Quan tum Technologies for Next Generation Sensor Networks Presented by Jason Mitchell\ , GSFC - Open to the public (subject to change)

Watch &\; Share: https://go.nasa.gov/32SnYBX

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Abstract:

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Accurate reference clocks are critical to navigation. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)\, principally the Global Positioning System (GPS) \, provide the precise space-based clocks that have revolutionized navigat ion and timekeeping terrestrially and within the Interoperable Space Servi ce Volume (SSV)\, i.e.\, near Earth including above the GNSS constellation s. Unfortunately\, for spacecraft navigation beyond Earth into deep space\ , GNSS is not available.

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While GNSS constellations are unavailable t o spacecraft in deep space\, observing X-ray emissions from rapidly spinni ng neutron stars\, called millisecond pulsars (MSPs)\, has been shown to f ill that gap\; a process often referred to as X-ray Navigation (XNAV). MSP s are distributed throughout our galaxy and many pulsate at intervals so r egular that they rival terrestrial atomic clocks on long time scales\, sim ilar to those clocks contained in GNSS satellites. By carefully timing the se pulsations\, an XNAV equipped spacecraft can use these celestial lighth ouses to autonomously determine its absolute position\, with uniform accur acy\, anywhere within our Solar System and even beyond. This is in contras t to conventional position determination using Earth-based tracking\, in w hich a communication link back to Earth is required and accuracy degrades as the distance from Earth grows.

 \;

In this webcast\, results will be presented of the Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technolo gy (SEXTANT) demonstration\, which successfully executed the first on-orbi t use of XNAV to perform autonomous onboard and real-time space navigation . SEXTANT was a NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Chan ging Development (GCD) program funded technology enhancement to the Neutro n-star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission\, which is currently operating on the International Space Station (ISS).

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Watch &\; Share: https://go.nasa.gov/32SnYBX

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